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03/25/2017

Do's and Don'ts of Deducting Charitable Donations

So, you donated six bags of clothes to Goodwill and gave your used washer and dryer to the Salvation Army.  Now you hope to claim the donations as a deduction. There are a few things to know before your tax preparer reports your Gifts to Charity on your federal income tax return.

Please Give Jar picFirst, donations must be made to a qualified charity in order to be deductible.  Gifts to individuals, political organizations or candidates are not deductible.  A qualified charity that is designated as a non-profit organization or a 501(c)(3) must not benefit or have as a focus any private shareholder or individual.  Qualified charities must also be up-to-date on their information reports to the IRS that show that their profits are being used for their tax-exempt purposes. To check the status of a charity the IRS now provides a one-stop online tool called Exempt Organizations Select Check (EO Select Check).

In order to deduct a charitable contribution, you must first itemize deductions on Form 1040, Schedule A - Itemized Deductions.  It is important to have documentation that shows the dollar amount of all claimed qualified donations and the specific organization to which the donation was made.  Noncash contributions should have information or may even need an appraisal that reflects the fair market value of the donation at the time it was given.

If you happened to get something in return for your donation, the value of what you received must be subtracted from the claimed donation amount.  You may only deduct the amount that exceeds the fair market value of the benefit received.  Many taxpayers miss this point.  For example, let’s say you participated in a silent auction fundraiser and you “won” with the highest bid, and the item you received was worth more than the amount you paid for it.  You may only deduct the difference between what you paid for the item and the fair market value of the item.  This includes benefits you received like merchandise, meals, and tickets to events or goods and services.

If you donate property instead of cash, the deductible amount is limited to the donated item’s fair market value or the price a seller would receive if the property sold on the open market.  Many taxpayers struggle with determining the value of things like used clothing and household items.  The IRS requires that the items be in good condition or better, and has an online resource to help taxpayers determine the fair market value of items.  Technically each item, including a pair of socks, is supposed to be identified on a worksheet along with its value in order to calculate the actual value of a donation.  Many taxpayers simply take their chances and submit only a receipt from a recognized charitable organization that lists the date and a general description of what is donated, such as “2 boxes of clothing”.  If a taxpayer is audited, they must provide proof for each donation.  Cars, boats and other types of property donations are subject to additional rules.

Whether you donate cash or goods, if the amount of any specific donation is $250 or more, you must submit a written statement from the charity confirming the details.  That statement must report the same donation amount that you’re claiming, and a description of any property that was given.  It must also state whether any goods or services were received in exchange for the donation.

If you make total noncash charitable contributions that exceed $500 for the year, you’ll need to fill out another form, Form 8283, that requires more details and more proof of value.  The type of records that a taxpayer must keep depends upon the amount and type of donation.

Here are examples of charitable contributions:

  • Money or property given to churches, synagogues and other religious organizations
  • Gifts to nonprofit schools and hospitals
  • Gifts to qualified charities such as The Salvation Army, Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts of America, CARE and Goodwill Industries
  • Donations to War Veterans groups
  • Out-of-pocket expenses when you serve a qualified organization as a volunteer

Here are items that are NOT deductible as charitable contributions:

  • The value of your time or services
  • The value of blood given to a blood bank (yes, it has been tried)
  • Cost of raffle, bingo, or lottery tickets
  • Dues, fees or bills paid to country clubs, lodges or fraternal orders
  • Money or property to groups that lobby for law changes
  • Donations to candidates for public office or political groups

If you have any questions about deducting charitable donations from your federal income tax, please contact one of our tax preparation experts at McRuer CPAs for more information.

Find out more about deducting Medical and Dental Expenses in our blog.

03/22/2017

Deducting Medical and Dental Expenses

If you incurred medical or dental expenses, you may be able to deduct them on your federal income tax return.  You may also include medical expenses you paid for your spouse and/or a dependent.  To do so you must itemize your deductions; so keeping receipts and good records is important as is knowing what qualifies as a deductible expense.

Qualified medical and dental expenses generally include the costs of:

  • diagnosing, treating, easing and preventing disease
  • prescription drugs and insulin
  • insurance premiums for policies that cover medical care
  • dental x-rays, extractions, dentures and teeth cleaning
  • chiropractic and acupuncture treatments
  • and much more!

Healthcare-costsEquipment and property improvements that are medically necessary may also be deducted.  This would include the cost of updates like installing railings and support bars, porch lifts, and widening doorways to address medical care needs.  However, the deductible amount of the capital improvement costs may be reduced if it increases the value of your property.  The allowable deduction would be reduced by the increase in the value of your property.

Even travel costs specifically related to medical care may be deducted; including public transportation, ambulance service, tolls and parking fees.  Personal vehicle mileage used for qualified medical care travel may be deducted using the standard medical travel mileage rate which is 19 cents per mile for 2016, or the actual travel costs may be deducted.

Costs that have been reimbursed by insurance and other sources do not qualify for a deduction.  You also may not claim a tax deduction for medical expenses that were paid from a Health Savings Account or Flexible Spending Arrangement, as those payments are made from pre-tax dollars and would be considered a double benefit.

Generally, you can deduct only the amount of your medical and dental expenses that is more than 10% of your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI).  But if either you or your spouse was born before January 2, 1952, you can deduct the amount of your medical and dental expenses that is more than 7.5% of your AGI.

To find out more about allowable qualified medical and dental expense deductions, click here for the tax information guide.  If you have questions, please contact one of our tax preparation specialists at McRuer CPAs for more information.

03/20/2017

April 1 Deadline For Required IRA Distributions

Taxpayers who reached age 70½ during 2016 have until April 1st to apply for and begin receiving required minimum distributions (RMDs) from an Individual Retirement Account (IRA) and/or workplace retirement plan.

Deadline approaches picThe April 1st deadline applies to owners of traditional IRAs, such as SEP and SIMPLE IRAS, but not Roth IRAs.  It also generally applies to participants in various workplace retirement plans, including 401(k), 403(b) and 457(b) plans.  Some employees who are still working may wait to receive distributions, if their plan allows, until April 1st of the year after they retire.

The April 1st deadline only applies to the required distribution for the first year.  For all subsequent years, the RMD must be made by December 31st of each year.  So, a taxpayer who turned age 70½ in 2016 and has received the first required distribution by April 1, 2017, must still receive the second RMD by December 31, 2017.

The amount of the distribution is calculated using life expectancy tables matched to the year-end IRA account value of the IRA.  Worksheets and life expectancy tables are available in in IRS Publication 590-B “Distributions From Individual Retirement Arrangements”.

It can be costly to miss the deadline for receiving a distribution, as the taxpayer faces a 50 percent tax that would be applied to any required amount not received by the April 1st deadline.

For more information, click here to read through frequently asked questions or contact one of our tax experts at McRuer CPAs.

03/17/2017

Saver's Credit Option Offers Rewards

Hand holding moneyThere’s a little known tax credit for people who have low to moderate income and are putting money aside to save for retirement.  The Saver’s Credit is available to eligible taxpayers to use in conjunction with the tax deduction they may already have qualified for by contributing to an IRA.

If your adjusted gross income is below $30,750 as an individual, $46,125 as a head of household or $61,500 as a married couple in 2016, you might be eligible for tax credit.  It can be worth between 10 and 50 percent of the amount you contribute to an IRA up to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples.  You would receive the tax credit on top of the benefits of a tax-free or tax-deferred retirement fund contribution.

The Saver’s Credit applies to contributions made to a traditional or Roth IRA, a 401(K) plan, a SIMPLE IRA, a SARSEP, your 403(b) plan, 501(c)(18) plan or a governmental 457(b) plan.  Voluntary after-tax employee contributions to a qualified retirement and 403(b) plans may also be eligible for the tax credit.

Find out more by clicking here for detailed information.

Splitting Your Tax Refund

Many taxpayers are choosing to split their tax refunds. Splitting refunds is easy and is done electronically through direct deposit allowing the Department of Treasury to deposit your refund dollars in any proportion you want. You may split funds for deposits in up to three different accounts with U.S. financial institutions.

Splitting wood with axe 1A taxpayer may also choose to have a portion of a refund deposited into an Individual Retirement Account or make a deposit into an account with a pre-paid debit card. A refund should only be deposited into an account or accounts that are in the taxpayer’s own name or spouse’s name, if it’s a joint account.

By splitting your refund, you benefit from the convenience of opting to have some of the money deposited into your checking account for immediate use and some deposited to an interest-bearing savings for future use.  In addition, you receive the safety and speed of direct deposit, allowing access to your refund faster than if you opt to receive a paper check. (See more about the direct deposit option in our blog “Going Digital with Direct Deposits”.)

You also may use part or all of your refund to buy U.S. Series I Savings Bonds for yourself or someone else.  The splitting of refunds is a rapidly growing choice among taxpayers as more digital resources become available and security concerns increase about paper trails and identity theft.

03/16/2017

IRA Moves That Save Tax Dollars

There’s still time to reduce your 2016 tax bill as you take steps to maximize the benefits of saving money for retirement.  There are different strategies that can save money or defer taxes through contributing to IRAs and retirement funds each tax year.  For the 2016 tax year, you have until April 18th to make a move. However, if you do make a qualifying IRA contribution between January 1 and April 18, make certain you specifically instruct your financial institution to apply the deposit to the 2016 tax year.  Otherwise, the deposit may automatically be considered a 2017 deposit.

Taxes and moneyUsing a Tax Refund for Tax Savings  Here’s another tip regarding your tax refund and saving for retirement: consider depositing all or part of your tax refund directly into an IRA.  It saves a step by directly depositing the money, it can speed up the timing of the contribution and ensures the deposit is made as you intend.  With a direct deposit, you can even choose to use your 2016 refund to pay for the amount of your 2016 IRA contribution as long as the tax return can be processed and the refund paid before the April 18th deadline. You would designate on Form 8888 “Allocation of Refund” how much of your refund should be deposited directly into your IRA and that it should be designated as your 2016 contribution.

How Much You Can Save  A working taxpayer can defer paying income tax on a contribution of pre-tax dollars up to $5,500 to a Traditional IRA and may split contributions to more than one IRA.  Income tax won’t be due on the money until it is withdrawn from the account.  Contributions to a Roth IRA are after-tax dollars and do not qualify for a tax deduction, though qualified distributions may be withdrawn tax-free at retirement. Contributions to both Traditional and Roth IRAs are limited depending upon modified adjusted gross income.

The actual amount of the tax deduction on a Traditional IRA depends upon the taxpayer’s income tax rate.  For example, a worker in the 25% tax bracket may save $1,375 in income taxes by making the maximum IRA contribution.  Workers in the 35% tax bracket may save $1,925 for the same contribution amount.

If you are age 50 and above, you may contribute an additional $1,000 to an IRA up to a total tax-deductible contribution of no more than $6,500. For example, the tax deduction can range from $975 for individuals in the 25% income tax bracket to $2,275 for those who are in a 35% tax bracket.

Married couples can double their tax deduction if they make the maximum contribution to an IRA in each spouse’s name.  Even if one of the spouses doesn’t work, a contribution can be made for that spouse subject to the spousal IRA limit. The combined contributions must be no more than $11,000 if both are under age 50, $12,000 if one spouse is 50 or older and $13,000 if both are at least 50 years old.

Who Qualifies For Tax Deduction  A taxpayer must earn income in order to save in an IRA. If a worker has no retirement plan at work, the tax deduction for Traditional IRA contributions is allowed in full regardless of income.  If a person or spouse has a retirement plan at work, the tax deduction and the contributions may be limited.  Amounts for both the allowable deduction and contributions phase out at higher income levels calculated as modified adjusted gross income.

People aged 70 ½ and older may no longer claim a tax deduction for their contributions to Traditional IRAs. Upon reaching that age, the fund’s owner must start taking required minimum distributions (RMDs).  Any deductible contributions and earning withdrawn from a Traditional IRA are taxable. Early withdrawals by a person under the age of 59 ½ may be subject to a 10% penalty.  Contributions made to a Roth IRA can be made after age 70 ½ and the amount in the account can be left there as long as the person lives. Qualified distributions are generally not taxable, but early withdrawals are subject to a 10% penalty.

Click here for a description of the difference between Traditional and Roth IRAs.

03/15/2017

Going Digital With Direct Deposits

More than ever before, taxpayers are choosing digital tools to file their tax returns and receive refunds. The latest numbers show 4 out of 5 taxpayers filed electronically in 2016 using a professional tax preparer or online software.  Of those taxpayers who qualified for a refund, 8 out of 10 chose to have the money deposited directly into a bank account rather than waiting for a check to arrive by mail.

Picture1The growth in digital tax tools use is due in part to IRS mandates.  Paper returns require more man hours to process; costing more and lengthening the time to receive a tax refund by weeks or months.  The IRS now requires most tax preparation professionals to file all tax returns and attachments electronically.  While under no mandate, more do-it-yourself taxpayers with simple tax returns are choosing to use the internet to prepare their returns using the IRS Free File software, and send electronically prepared returns through IRS e-File.  This trend reflects security and privacy concerns as well as worries about delays that can come from paper filings and paper checks.

Combining IRS e-File with the direct deposit program is the fastest way to receive a refund and the transaction is free.  Most refunds are issued within 21 calendar days once the IRS receives a tax return.  A taxpayer may request that their refund be split into deposits in up to three separate financial accounts.  There are also options to purchase savings bonds, have a portion of a refund deposited into an Individual Retirement Account or make a deposit into an account with a pre-paid debit card.  A refund should only be deposited into an account or accounts that are in the taxpayer’s own name or spouse’s name, if it’s a joint account.

Tax agency officials try to reassure taxpayers the system used to receive tax records and payments as well as send refunds is the safest system available.  In the fall of 2015 and again in January 2016, new IRS software updates crashed the system and a small part of its online payment collection system was hacked causing delays and the need to reset taxpayer pins for security.  

Today, the IRS uses the same electronic transfer system for refunds that is used to deliver almost all Social Security and Veterans Affairs benefits to millions of accounts.  It combines built-in security protection tools with layers of online protection programs provided by banks and financial institutions.

You can request the electronic direct deposit option to receive your refund even if you file a paper return by mail; yet know that processing a paper return takes the IRS on average two months longer than processing a digital return.  Requesting a direct deposit of your refund will not speed up the processing time.

If you have questions about the direct deposit option for income tax refunds, please contact one of our tax preparation specialists at McRuer CPAs for more information.

02/15/2017

Costs of Free Online Tax Prep Tools

More taxpayers who prepare their own taxes are turning to internet resources versus software, but they should be aware of information-sharing nuances as they sign-up for the growing number of free online services.

A recent Wall Street Journal article took a look at the “free” of free online tax preparation services to identify whether there were any hidden costs.  The article reveals that while the online companies are attracting millions of do-it-yourself tax filers by offering free tax preparation tools, some service providers seek “to collect income and other data from its tax-prep users to make recommendations for credit cards and other financial products to them.”

Online tax software probeThe article confirms that when a customer follows through and buys the recommended products, that’s when the service provider makes money by being paid by a third party financial institution. This doesn’t cost the user upfront, but it’s a type of third party advertising that uses information sharing as its money-making tool.

Free online tax preparation service provider Credit Karma was interviewed in the article about the practice and the Company responded that this year it requires people to become Credit Karma “members” before they can use the free tax preparation services.  On the Company’s website members must provide their name, address, date of birth, mobile phone number and the last 4 digits of their Social Security Number.  Credit Karma says it does not charge third parties to advertise about their products or services, but rather uses a member’s information to suggest products and services that could help the member financially. The members are not charged, and Credit Karma is only paid if a member buys a product or service that it suggested.

Credit Karma members can select an “opt out” option to prevent the Company from using their tax return data, which includes their income and tax payments or refunds information, but not all customers are aware that their basic membership data may be shared.  One customer was quoted in the article saying that she had been approached by her credit-card company asking her to update her income after using Credit Karma’s free tax preparation service.  Credit Karma responded that the notice had nothing to do with her membership, but the customer deactivated her account anyway. Other providers say they also offer users ways to opt out of any information sharing.

Some of the other major online tax preparation service providers include Intuit, H&R Block, TaxAct and Blucora.  These companies may provide easy-to-use cost-free tax preparation tools via the internet, but when it comes to more complicated tax returns or state income tax returns, there are usually charges for the necessary forms and data calculation which are considered upgrades by the vendor.

It is also important for taxpayers with more complicated returns to know the questions and forms they need in order for the systems to share information and solutions, so there can be confusion and missed opportunities to claim tax credits and file the proper forms.

More taxpayers than ever before are turning to digital resources both online and through software to prepare and file their simple tax returns, but they should be mindful that even basic tax preparation services may have a complicated back-end effect on privacy and hidden advertising tactics.

Going Digital With Direct Deposits


Internet-sales-tax copyMore than ever before, taxpayers are choosing digital tools to file their tax returns and receive refunds. The latest numbers show 4 out of 5 taxpayers filed electronically in 2016 using a professional tax preparer or online software.  Of those taxpayers who qualified for a refund, 8 out of 10 chose to have the money deposited directly into a bank account rather than waiting for a check to arrive by mail.

The growth in digital tax tools use is due in part to IRS mandates.  Paper returns require more man hours to process; costing more and lengthening the time to receive a tax refund by weeks or months.  The IRS now requires most tax preparation professionals to file all tax returns and attachments electronically.  While under no mandate, more do-it-yourself taxpayers with simple tax returns are choosing to use the internet to prepare their returns using the IRS Free File software, and send electronically prepared returns through IRS e-File. This trend reflects security and privacy concerns as well as worries about delays that can come from paper filings and paper checks.

Combining IRS e-File with the direct deposit program is the fastest way to receive a refund and the transaction is free.  Most refunds are issued within 21 calendar days once the IRS receives a tax return.  A taxpayer may request that their refund be split into deposits in up to three separate financial accounts.  There are also options to purchase savings bonds, have a portion of a refund deposited into an Individual Retirement Account or make a deposit into an account with a pre-paid debit card.  A refund should only be deposited into an account or accounts that are in the taxpayer’s own name or spouse’s name, if it’s a joint account.

Tax agency officials try to reassure taxpayers the system used to receive tax records and payments as well as send refunds is the safest system available.  In the fall of 2015 and again in January 2016, new IRS software updates crashed the system and a small part of its online payment collection system was hacked causing delays and the need to reset taxpayer pins for security.

Today, the IRS uses the same electronic transfer system for refunds that is used to deliver almost all Social Security and Veterans Affairs benefits to millions of accounts.  It combines built-in security protection tools with layers of online protection programs provided by banks and financial institutions.

You can request the electronic direct deposit option to receive your refund even if you file a paper return by mail; yet know that processing a paper return takes the IRS on average two months longer than processing a digital return.  Requesting a direct deposit of your refund will not speed up the processing time.

If you have questions about the direct deposit option for income tax refunds, please contact one of our tax preparation specialists at McRuer CPAs for more information.

02/14/2017

Saving with myRA

The US Department of Treasury is offering the new myRA retirement savings account for people who have no access to a retirement savings plan at their job or lack other options to save.  It is a simple fund that is easy and free to open.  The idea is that if you give people a bit of help, they will learn the benefits of saving money and begin new habits that will last a lifetime.

MyRA logoA myRA account earns interest at the same rate as investments in the Government Securities Fund (average annual return of 2.94% over the last ten years) which are backed by the US Treasury.  It costs nothing to open the account and there are no fees.  A myRA is operated under Roth IRA Rules, so there is an annual contribution limit of $5,500 ($6,500 for individuals 50 years of age or older).  The fund is limited to a maximum $15,000.

The fund’s owner may withdraw any amount of money at any time tax-free and with no penalty.  The money can also be transferred to a private-sector Roth IRA at any time with no penalty.

Contributions may be made from direct deposits from a person’s paycheck, checking or savings account, and a federal income tax refund by marking the “savings” box on the refund section of a return.

The fund is designed to be a part of what is described as a “larger savings journey” with online tracking tools including a myRA Savings Goal calculator.  For more information, click here to visit the “Get Answers” page of the myRA website.

02/13/2017

EITC Refunds Slow

Big-tax-refundChanges in tax law may cause a delay in receiving tax refunds for early tax filers.  New in 2017, the 2015 Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act has moved up the Forms W-2 filing deadline for employers and small businesses to January 31st from the previous end-of-February deadline.  The new deadline also applies to certain Forms 1099.  The new January 31st deadline is designed to help the IRS spot errors in early returns filed by taxpayers.  Having the Forms W-2 and 1099 sooner makes it easier to verify legitimate tax returns and send out refunds.

However, the changes will mean that early tax filers who apply for certain tax credits should expect that their refunds will arrive later than in past years.  If you claim the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC), the law prevents the issuing of the refund(s) until February 15th.

The way the calendar dates occur this tax season, even if a qualifying taxpayer has a refund issued on the first available day, February 15th, the money may not arrive even through a direct deposit until the week of February 27th.  Financial institutions need a few days to process the deposits and many do not process payments on weekends or holidays.  The President’s Day holiday on February 20th will also delay processing.  If a taxpayer has requested their refund to be paid by check, the delay in receiving payment could be several days or weeks longer, even into March.

02/10/2017

W-2 Scam Targets Small Business

Question-yikA5pBiEThe IRS has issued a new tax-related identity-theft scam warning to small businesses and human resources professionals.  The email phishing scam uses a business owner’s, corporate officer’s or human resource professional’s name in what looks like company or even official tax agency emails. The emails request copies of employee Forms W-2 from company payroll, internal accounting or human resources departments.

This is the second time the email scam has been identified as attacking businesses nationwide. The IRS urges business owners, internal accountants and company payroll officials to double check any executive-level requests for lists of Forms W-2 or Social Security Numbers.

The W-2 scam first appeared in early 2016. The IRS reports that cybercriminals tricked payroll and human resource officials into disclosing employee names, SSNs and income information. The thieves then attempted to file fraudulent tax returns to create fraudulent income tax refunds in a tax-related identity theft scheme.

This phishing variation is known as a “spoofing” e-mail.  It will contain, for example, the actual company chief executive officer’s name.  In this variation, the “CEO” sends an email to a company payroll office or human resource employee requesting a list of employees and information including their SSNs.

Crime investigators say some of the wording used in actual scam emails included:

  • “Kindly send me the individual 2016 Forms W-2 (PDF) and earnings summaries of our company staff for a quick review.”
  • “Can you send me the updated list of employees with full details (Name, Social Security Number, Date of Birth, Home Address, Salary).”
  • “I want you to send me the list of Form W-2 copies of employees’ wage and tax statement for 2016.  I need them in PDF file type, and please send it as an attachment.  Kindly prepare the lists and email them to me asap.”

Working together in the Security Summit, the IRS, states and tax industry representatives have made progress fighting against tax-related identity theft.  However, cybercriminals continue developing more sophisticated tactics to impersonate taxpayers in their effort to steal even more data.

For more information about tax-related identity theft and other tax scams, click here to link to The Security Summit’s national taxpayer awareness campaign called “Taxes. Security. Together.

01/09/2017

2017 Mileage Rates for Business Use of a Vehicle

As reported by the Journal of Accountancy: The IRS has announced  the optional standard mileage rates for business use of a vehicle will drop slightly in 2017, the second consecutive annual decline. For business use of a car, van, pickup truck, or panel truck, the rate for 2017 will be 53.5 cents per mile, down from 54 cents per mile in 2016. Taxpayers can use the optional standard mileage rates to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile.

Driving for medical or moving purposes may be deducted at 17 cents per mile, which is two cents lower than for 2016. The rate for service to a charitable organization is unchanged, set by statute at 14 cents per mile (Sec. 170(i)).

The portion of the business standard mileage rate that is treated as depreciation will be 25 cents per mile for 2017, one cent higher than for 2016.

To compute the allowance under a fixed and variable rate (FAVR) plan, the maximum standard automobile cost is $27,900 for 2017 (down from $28,000 for 2016) for automobiles (not including trucks and vans) and $31,300 for trucks and vans (an increase of $300 from 2016). Under a FAVR plan, a standard amount is deemed substantiated for an employer’s reimbursement to employees for expenses they incur in driving their vehicle in performing services as an employee for the employer.

See more at: http://www.journalofaccountancy.com/news/2016/dec/irs-2017-mileage-rates-201615701.html#sthash.sxZ6OHvw.dpuf

01/06/2017

2017 Tax Rates (If Nothing Changes)

Income tax graphicPending any immediate changes under a new administration, tax officials say low inflation rates will ensure that current tax brackets and most other tax system features will change only slightly in 2017 with the exception of effects of health coverage mandates.

The standard deduction will rise $50 for individuals to $6,350 from $6,300.  The personal exemption increased $4,050 in 2016 and will remain the same in 2017. The standard deduction for married filing jointly rises $100 to $12,700.

The personal exemption for tax year 2017 remains at $4,050.  However, the exemption is subject to a phase-out that begins with adjusted gross incomes of $261,500 ($313,800 for married couples filing jointly). It phases out completely at $384,000 ($436,300 for married couples filing jointly).

But for those taxpayers who do not maintain the minimum essential health coverage in 2017, the penalty which is collected by the IRS will increase significantly. The charge for failing to have qualified health insurance coverage will be $695 or 2.5% of income for individuals and $2,085 or 2.5% of income for families.  The penalty was $325 for individuals and $975 for families in 2015. That was an increase from the penalty of $95 for individuals or $285 for families in 2014.

The 2017 top individual tax rate of 39.6% will apply to income above $470,000 for married couples, up
from $466,950.  The Affordable Care Act (ACA) or ‘Obamacare’ mandates that high-income taxpayers pay another 3.8% surtax on net investment income, so the top federal income tax rate for individuals is actually 43.4% and will remain at that level pending a possible ACA repeal.

Qualified dividends and long-term capital gains are also taxed an additional 15% or 20% depending upon income and are subject to another 3.8% net investment income tax.

Estates of decedents who die during 2017 have a basic exclusion amount of $5,490,000, up from a total of $5,450,000 for estates of decedents who died in 2016.

These rates are set to apply to 2017 taxes which will be filed in early 2018.

Call us at McRuer CPAs if you have any questions: 816.741.7882 or contact us online by clicking here.

01/03/2017

2016 Individual Income Tax Filing Season Launches January 23

Taxtime graphicThe tax season for processing 2016 federal income tax returns begins Monday, January 23, 2017.  The tax day deadline will be April 18th this season, to adapt to the Easter holiday weekend.

The IRS says it would start accepting electronic tax returns on January 23rd and it anticipates more than 153 million individual tax returns to be filed.  This, as Congress is expected to continue tight budget constraints on the agency under a new administration.  Taxpayer advocates warn taxpayers to expect delays in processing, more computer-driven automatic correspondence audits (letters that are sent by computers to taxpayers when a tax return issue raises a flag without a preliminary review by human eyes), and extremely long wait times should a taxpayer need to connect with the agency to ask a question or respond to a correspondence audit.

Taxpayers may also be affected by a new law that requires the IRS to hold tax refunds claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Additional Child Tax Credit until February 15th.  The IRS says the delays are due to the additional time needed for these tax refunds to be released and processed through financial institutions.  Factoring in weekends and the President’s Day holiday, the IRS is warning many affected taxpayers may not have actual access to their tax refunds until the week of February 27th, if they have filed a completed tax return by the end of January.  

For more information on the status of a refund, a taxpayer may use the online resource called "Where's My Refund?".

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