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4 posts from April 2016

04/15/2016

Filing For a Tax Extension to Meet Deadline Time

Paying-taxesAlthough taxpayers have an extra weekend to prepare and file individual income tax returns due to the Friday April 15th federal holiday, the Monday April 18th deadline arrives with the same rules.  You must file your 2015 individual income tax return by the deadline or face penalties as well as additional penalties and interest charges on any unpaid taxes owed.

Even if you’re filing an extension allowing up to six months more time to complete and file your final return, you are still required to pay the estimated taxes you owe by the April 18th deadline.

Filing an Extension

At this point, there are only a few more days to complete your tax return on or before the deadline.  If you have a complicated return and have not yet submitted tax information to your tax preparation professional, requesting an extension of time to file may be your best option.

Form 4868 is the application you need for an automatic extension of time to file your federal individual income taxes.  The IRS will give you up to October 17, 2016 to file your 2015 individual income tax return before new late filing penalties will be assessed. You may file it any time before the extension expires.  Qualifying taxpayers who are out of the country are allowed two extra months to file and pay taxes owed without facing a penalty.  Those taxpayers include citizens who are in the military serving outside the country or live and/or work outside the United States and Puerto Rico. (Read more about military service tax benefits by clicking here.)

If you request an extension, you will still owe interest on any tax that was not paid by the regular due date, even if you qualify for the two-month extension to file your return. (Find out more about the penalties you may face by clicking here to read The Price of Missed Tax Deadlines.)

One way to escape having to file the extension request tax form is to pay the taxes you owe through an IRS venue such as Direct Pay, EFTPS or using your own credit card on irs.gov.  When you pay all that you owe online by the deadline through these venues you will receive a confirmation number for your records and do not have to file the Form 4868.  However, you will need to file your tax return as soon as you can.  On that return you will be asked to share your confirmation of paying your taxes by the deadline.  You still face a late filing penalty, but will not have to pay penalty and interest on the taxes owed. (For information about ways to pay the tax you owe, click here to read Tax Payment Options to Meet Deadline Date.)

Businesses may also apply for an extension of time to file tax returns under certain circumstances, such as being in the middle of declaring bankruptcy. Form 7004 provides a tool to request a 5-month or 6-month extension of time without paying a late filing penalty. Form 1138 allows certain corporations an extension of time to file if the entity is expecting a net operating loss carryback that cannot be calculated by the designated tax deadline date.

If you have any questions about filing an extension or meeting your tax deadline obligation, please contact us at McRuer CPAs for more information.

04/08/2016

The Price of Missed Tax Deadlines

Ouch! When you don’t file and don’t pay your income taxes on time, you’re going to pay a price in penalties and interest that will apply to the taxes you owe and the time it takes you to file your return. These penalties and interest charges begin the day after you miss the deadline...AND like the Energizer Bunny, they keep adding and adding and adding to the amount you owe until the taxes owed are paid in full and the required tax returns are filed.Money-1ccc

Interest - If you don’t pay your taxes by the deadline, interest begins right away on the amount of tax you owe.  It adds up until the day you pay the tax owed.  Even if you had what the IRS would determine as a “good reason” for not paying on time, you will still owe the interest on any outstanding amount.  Interest is charged in addition to penalties assessed.

Late Payment Penalty - Even if you make a partial payment of the taxes you owe by the tax deadline date, you will still be assessed a penalty for paying any remaining balance late.  The late payment penalty is usually ½ of 1% of any tax that is owed.  The penalty is charged for each month or part of a month the tax remains unpaid. The maximum penalty charged is 25% of what is owed.

The late payment penalty will not be charged if you can prove to the IRS that you have a reasonable cause for not paying on time.  A reasonable cause must be documented and could include things such as serious illness or incapacitation, a natural disaster or fire, the inability to obtain records, and the unavoidable absence or death of a member of the taxpayer’s family that causes a delay in completing a tax return.  However, the lack of funds to pay taxes cannot be used as an excuse to file late or fail to file a return.

Late Filing Penalty - A late filing penalty is charged even when you request an extension. The penalty is usually 5% of the amount due for each month or part of a month your return is late.  This penalty is assessed on top of the late payment penalty and in addition to interest charged on outstanding taxes.  The maximum penalty for filing late is 25%.  If your return is more than 60 days late, the minimum penalty is $135 or the balance of the tax due on your return, whichever is smaller.  Again, you may avoid this penalty if you have a reasonable cause.

Now, let’s also consider the penalties and interest owed on any late state and local tax filings or taxes owed.  Sometimes taxpayers forget that tax deadlines also apply to state and local tax filings. States, counties and municipalities have different ways of assessing and collecting taxes and also enforce penalties for failure to file, failure to file on time and failure to pay taxes.  All of this can add up very quickly.

Another issue taxpayers sometimes miss is that all the different penalties and interest charges are independent of each other and may be added one on top of the other to the original tax obligation.  They also don't go away. New tallies on remaining balances continue to calculate until all obligations are met.  This is how the interest and penalties can add up making paying on time and in full as well as filing on time a much better choice.

The longer you wait to settle current or past tax issues with late filings and payments, the more it will cost you in money and anxiety. There are ways to ease the burden. If you need more information on how much you may owe for not filing or not paying your taxes on time, please contact us at McRuer CPAs.  We’ll help you figure the cost as well as your options to pay any penalties and interest you may owe.

Tax Payment Options to Meet Deadline Date

The IRS says more than 70 percent of taxpayers will receive tax refunds this year due to tax credits and having too much of their income withheld.  Last year’s average tax refund was $2,797 and it’s expected to be close to the same average for this year’s tax season.

Meanwhile, for the rest of taxpayers who owe taxes there are new and faster ways to pay.  The IRS offers several online or direct-call opportunities to pay taxes even without filing on time. 

Paying-moneyThe Direct Pay option allows individuals to pay their outstanding taxes or estimated taxes directly from a checking or savings account.  A taxpayer receives an immediate confirmation of payment if making an instant payment or can schedule a payment to be made at a later time or at future intervals.  The IRS system does not store the payment information after the transaction to avoid online hackers.  See a previous ReSource article Another Cyberattack on Taxpayer Information for more information about tax-related identity theft occurring through IRS systems.

For the first time there’s a new cash payment option for taxpayers in partnership with two online payment processing companies including OfficialPayments.com and PayNearMe.  Individuals may now use up to $1,000 cash per day to pay outstanding taxes if they do not have or do not want to use a bank account or credit card.  Payments can be made at more than 7,000 participating 7-Eleven convenience stores across the country.

The IRS still promotes that the easiest way to pay individual and business taxes is through the Department of Treasury’s Electronic Federal Tax Payment System or EFTPS.  A relatively new feature to this online registration payment method is the EFTPS Voice Response System.  Both services are offered for free with no extra fees charged for processing and scheduling regular payments.

Through EFTPS a taxpayer can use the internet, phone or mobile device to make, schedule and review tax payments any time of day.  Businesses and individuals can schedule payments up to a year in advance. Payments can be changed or cancelled up to two days before the scheduled transaction date. This method provides a way to pay all types of federal taxes from individual to business federal income taxes, employment taxes, estimated taxes and excise taxes.

Should a taxpayer prefer to use a credit or debit card to pay taxes, the IRS accepts payments from Visa, MasterCard, American Express and other card vendors.  The taxpayer must submit the payment information through IRS-approved secure credit card processing companies.  Each processing company charges a fee for the transaction.  The system is not designed to accept high balance tax payments nor federal tax deposits. Generally, the payments are limited to 2 per year for individuals and 2 per quarter for estimated tax payments.  The providers are Pay1040.com, PayUSATax.com and OfficialPayments. You can review the the IRS-approved options by clicking here.

We’ve explained a lot about federal income taxes, but don’t forget that you also have state and local tax obligations and deadlines.  Each state, county and municipality has different ways of accepting tax filings and payments.  Most have online payment programs in place.  Check with your state and local tax collector’s office online or by phone if you have questions about how, when and where to file your tax return and make tax payments as needed.

If you continually receive tax refunds, it may be a sign that you’re having too much withheld.  The money could be put to better use than loaning it to the government for free.  On the other hand, if you owe taxes every year that you did not expect, you may benefit from strategic tax planning that could lessen your tax burden or provide a more consistent tax payment structure that could ease tax deadline pressures. 

At McRuer CPAs it is our goal to make certain you pay only the taxes you owe. Contact us to set up a tax review session with one of our tax preparation experts.

04/04/2016

Tax Freedom Day Federal and State

The Tax Foundation has released its summary on Tax Freedom Day. It reveals that April 24th is the day this year that marks theoretically how long all Americans must work to earn enough income to pay the nation’s total tax bill.

A Wikipedia entry describes how Tax Freedom Day is calculated; “Every dollar that is officially considered income by the government is counted, and every payment to the government that is officially considered a tax is counted.” The specific date is determined by adding up all federal, state, and local taxes and then dividing that number by the nation’s income.

The Tax Foundation summary reports Americans will pay $3.3 trillion in federal taxes and $1.6 trillion in state and local taxes. That’s a total tax bill of nearly $5 trillion adding up to 31% of the nation’s income. The reports says, "Americans will collectively spend more on taxes in 2016 than they will on food, clothing, and housing combined.”

This year’s April 24th Tax Freedom Day is 114 days into the year (excluding Leap Day). It is one day earlier than last year, due to slightly lower federal tax collections.

If you add annual federal borrowing into the mix, that is, future taxes owed, Tax Freedom Day would occur 16 days later on May 10.

FreedomStates have different State Tax Freedom Days because they each have different tax policies. The taxation and income variances translate into higher-income and higher-tax states celebrating the date later while lower-income and lower-tax states hit the mark sooner. For example, Mississippi has the lowest average tax burden and the tax freedom day for its residents is April 5th this year. Connecticut and New Jersey’s tax freedom days are much later on May 21 and May 12, respectively.

McRuer CPAs clients in the central Midwest see the following State Tax Freedom Days: April 12 for Missouri, April 14 for Iowa and Nebraska, April 13 for Arkansas, and April 19 for Kansas.

To find out more about Tax Freedom Day click here to read the Tax Foundation’s Summary Report.

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