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01/11/2018

2018 Income Tax Withholding Tables Now Confirmed

The IRS has released the updated 2018 federal income tax withholding tables reflecting the recent tax reform.  This is the first of several updates that will be released in the next few weeks.

The updated withholding information, now posted online (click here to view the new tables), shows the new rates for employers to use for computing employee withholding amounts.  Employers are requested to begin using the 2018 withholding tables as soon as possible, but not later than February 15, 2018. They should continue using the 2017 withholding tables until they have fully implemented the new 2018 withholding rules. Calculating pay and taxes

When employees will see the changes in their paychecks will vary depending on how quickly their employers implement the new tables, and how often they are paid — generally weekly, biweekly or monthly.  Most employees will begin seeing paycheck increases in February.

The new withholding tables are designed to work with the Forms W-4 that workers should have already filed with their employers to claim withholding allowances.  Employees do not have to do anything at this time.

Acting IRS Commissioner David Kautter says the IRS will be providing more information in the next several weeks to help employers and individuals understand and review the withholding changes and the other tax reform affecting payrolls and paychecks.  Kautter explains the new tax withholding tables are designed to produce the correct tax withholding amount for taxpayers with simpler tax situations.  He says the revisions are also aimed at avoiding income tax over- and under-withholding as much as possible.  Soon the IRS will release additional updated information for taxpayers with more complicated tax plans.

Meanwhile, the IRS is working on revising its online withholding tax calculator to reflect the new tax law data and expects the calculator will be available by the end of February.  A revised Form W-4  is also being developed.  Both the Form W-4 and the online calculator will estimate the effect of changes such as itemized deductions, child tax credit increases, the new dependent credit and the repeal of dependent exemptions. These tools may be used by employees wishing to update their withholding in response to new tax reform law, to reflect changes in their personal circumstances in 2018, and by workers starting a new job.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us at McRuer CPAs online or call us at 816.741.7882.

01/03/2018

Withholding Guidance for Small Business Coming Soon

Hand and calculatorThe IRS has released a short update to answer questions from small businesses about how soon they should implement changes from the newly approved tax reform bill.

Currently, the IRS says it plans to "issue the withholding guidance some time in January, and employers and payroll service providers will be encouraged to implement the changes in February."  The updated information is supposed to be designed to work with the existing Forms W-4 that employees have already filed.  This is to make certain no additional action by taxpaying employees will be needed regarding the amount of taxes that should be withheld for each individual.

The 2018 withholding guidelines should enable taxpayers to see changes from the tax reform bill reflected in their paychecks as early as February.  Until the new tables are released, employers and payroll service providers are asked to continue to use the 2017 withholding tables and systems.

If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact McRuer CPAs online or call us at 816.741.7882. 

12/19/2017

How Tax Overhaul Would Change Business Taxes

Although the exact details are not yet confirmed, we expect a number of changes in the new tax reform bill will affect both large and small businesses.   The Journal of Accountancy, a leading resource on legislative matters affecting accounting regulations, has issued the following summary of the tax bill's expected reforms. As a service to you, we are providing this summary in its entirety for your review.

How Tax Overhaul Would Change Business Taxes

The tax reform bill that Congress is expected to vote on this week contains numerous changes that will affect businesses large and small. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, H.R. 1, would make sweeping modifications to the Internal Revenue Code, including a much lower corporate tax rate, changes to credits and deductions, and a move to a territorial system for corporations that have overseas earnings.

Here are many of the bill’s business provisions.

Corporate tax rate

The bill would replace the current graduated corporate tax rate, which taxes income over $10 million at 35%, with a flat rate of 21%. The House version of H.R. 1 had provided for a special 25% rate on personal service corporations, but that special rate does not appear in the final bill. The new rate would take effect Jan. 1, 2018.

Corporate AMT

The bill would repeal the corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT).

Depreciation

Bonus depreciation: The bill would extend and modify bonus depreciation under Sec. 168(k), allowing businesses to immediately deduct 100% of the cost of eligible property in the year it is placed in service, through 2022. The amount of allowable bonus depreciation would then be phased down over four years: 80% would be allowed for property placed in service in 2023, 60% in 2024, 40% in 2025, and 20% in 2026. (For certain property with long production periods, the above dates would be pushed out a year.)

The bill would also remove the requirement that bonus depreciation is only available for new property.

Luxury automobile depreciation limits: The bill would increase the depreciation limits under Sec. 280F that apply to listed property. For passenger automobiles placed in service after 2017 and for which bonus depreciation is not claimed, the maximum amount of allowable depreciation is $10,000 for the year in which the vehicle is placed in service, $16,000 for the second year, $9,600 for the third year, and $5,760 for the fourth and later years.

Sec. 179 expensing: The bill would increase the maximum amount a taxpayer may expense under Sec. 179 to $1 million and increase the phaseout threshold to $2.5 million. These amounts would be indexed for inflation after 2018.

The bill would also expand the definition of Sec. 179 property to include certain depreciable tangible personal property used predominantly to furnish lodging or in connection with furnishing lodging. It would also expand the definition of qualified real property eligible for Sec. 179 expensing to include any of the following improvements to nonresidential real property: roofs; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning property; fire protection and alarm systems; and security systems.

Accounting methods

Cash method of accounting: The bill would expand the list of taxpayers that are eligible to use the cash method of accounting by allowing taxpayers that have average annual gross receipts of $25 million or less in the three prior tax years to use the cash method. The $25 million gross-receipts threshold would be indexed for inflation after 2018. Under the provision, the cash method of accounting may be used by taxpayers, other than tax shelters, that satisfy the gross-receipts test, regardless of whether the purchase, production, or sale of merchandise is an income-producing factor.

Farming C corporations (or farming partnerships with a C corporation partner) would be allowed to use the cash method if they meet the $25 million gross-receipts test.

The current-law exceptions from the use of the accrual method would otherwise remain the same, so qualified personal service corporations, partnerships without C corporation partners, S corporations, and other passthrough entities would continue to be allowed to use the cash method without regard to whether they meet the $25 million gross-receipts test, so long as the use of such method clearly reflects income.

Inventories: Taxpayers that meet the cash method $25 million gross-receipts test would also not be required to account for inventories under Sec. 471. Instead, they would be allowed to use an accounting method that either treats inventories as nonincidental materials and supplies or conforms to their financial accounting treatment of inventories.

UNICAP: Taxpayers that meet the cash-method $25 million gross-receipts test would be exempted from the uniform capitalization rules of Sec. 263A. (Current-law exemptions from the UNICAP rules that are not based on gross receipts are retained in the law.)

Expenses and deductions

Interest deduction limitation: Under the bill, the deduction for business interest would be limited to the sum of (1) business interest income; (2) 30% of the taxpayer’s adjusted taxable income for the tax year; and (3) the taxpayer’s floor plan financing interest for the tax year. Any disallowed business interest deduction could be carried forward indefinitely (with certain restrictions for partnerships).

Any taxpayer that meets the $25 million gross-receipts test would be exempt from the interest deduction limitation. The limitation would also not apply to any real property development, redevelopment, construction, reconstruction, acquisition, conversion, rental, operation, management, leasing, or brokerage trade or business. Farming businesses would be allowed to elect out of the limitation.

For these purposes, business interest means any interest paid or accrued on indebtedness properly allocable to a trade or business. Business interest income means the amount of interest includible in the taxpayer’s gross income for the tax year that is properly allocable to a trade or business. However, business interest does not include investment interest, and business interest income does not include investment income, within the meaning of Sec. 163(d).

Floor plan financing interest means interest paid or accrued on indebtedness used to finance the acquisition of motor vehicles held for sale or lease to retail customers and secured by the inventory so acquired.

Net operating losses: The bill would limit the deduction for net operating losses (NOLs) to 80% of taxable income (determined without regard to the deduction) for losses. (Property and casualty insurance companies are exempt from this limitation.)

Taxpayers would be allowed to carry NOLs forward indefinitely. The two-year carryback and special NOL carryback provisions would be repealed. However, farming businesses would still be allowed a two-year NOL carryback.

Like-kind exchanges: Under the bill, like-kind exchanges under Sec. 1031 would be limited to exchanges of real property that is not primarily held for sale. This provision generally applies to exchanges completed after Dec. 31, 2017. However, an exception is provided for any exchange if the property disposed of by the taxpayer in the exchange is disposed of on or before Dec. 31, 2017, or the property received by the taxpayer in the exchange is received on or before that date.

Domestic production activities: The bill would repeal the Sec. 199 domestic production activities deduction.

Entertainment expenses: The bill would disallow a deduction with respect to (1) an activity generally considered to be entertainment, amusement, or recreation; (2) membership dues with respect to any club organized for business, pleasure, recreation, or other social purposes; or (3) a facility or portion thereof used in connection with any of the above items.

Qualified transportation fringe benefits: The bill would disallow a deduction for expenses associated with providing any qualified transportation fringe to employees of the taxpayer, and except as necessary for ensuring the safety of an employee, any expense incurred for providing transportation (or any payment or reimbursement) for commuting between the employee’s residence and place of employment.

Meals: Under the bill taxpayers would still generally be able to deduct 50% of the food and beverage expenses associated with operating their trade or business (e.g., meals consumed by employees on work travel). For amounts incurred and paid after Dec. 31, 2017, and until Dec. 31, 2025, the bill would expand this 50% limitation to expenses of the employer associated with providing food and beverages to employees through an eating facility that meets requirements for de minimis fringes and for the convenience of the employer. Such amounts incurred and paid after Dec. 31, 2025, would not be deductible.

Partnership technical terminations: The bill would repeal the Sec. 708(b)(1)(B) rule providing for technical terminations of partnerships under specified circumstances. The provision does not change the current-law rule of Sec. 708(b)(1)(A) that a partnership is considered as terminated if no part of any business, financial operation, or venture of the partnership continues to be carried on by any of its partners in a partnership.

Carried interests: The bill would provide for a three-year holding period in the case of certain net long-term capital gain with respect to any applicable partnership interest held by the taxpayer. It would treat as short-term capital gain taxed at ordinary income rates the amount of a taxpayer’s net long-term capital gain with respect to an applicable partnership interest if the partnership interest has been held for less than three years.

The conference report clarifies that the three-year holding requirement applies notwithstanding the rules of Sec. 83 or any election in effect under Sec. 83(b).

Amortization of research and experimental expenditures: Under the bill, amounts defined as specified research or experimental expenditures must be capitalized and amortized ratably over a five-year period. Specified research or experimental expenditures that are attributable to research that is conducted outside of the United States must be capitalized and amortized ratably over a 15-year period.

Year of inclusion: The bill would require accrual-method taxpayers subject to the all-events test to recognize items of gross income for tax purposes in the year in which they recognize the income on their applicable financial statement (or another financial statement under rules to be specified by the IRS). The bill would provide an exception for taxpayers without an applicable or other specified financial statement.

Credits

The bill would modify a number of credits available to businesses. The House version of the bill would have repealed a large number of business credits, but the final bill generally does not repeal those credits. Changes to business credits in the final bill include:

Orphan drug credit: The amount of the Sec. 45C credit for clinical testing expenses for drugs for rare diseases or conditions would be reduced to 25% (from the current 50%).

Rehabilitation credit: The bill would modify the Sec. 47 rehabilitation credit to repeal the 10% credit for pre-1936 buildings and retain the 20% credit for certified historic structures. However, the credit would be claimed over a five-year period.

Employer credit for paid family or medical leave: The bill would allow eligible employers to claim a credit equal to 12.5% of the amount of wages paid to a qualifying employee during any period in which the employee is on family and medical leave if the rate of payment under the program is 50% of the wages normally paid to the employee. The credit is increased by 0.25 percentage points (but not above 25%) for each percentage point by which the rate of payment exceeds 50%. The maximum amount of family and medical leave that may be taken into account with respect to any employee for any tax year is 12 weeks. However, the credit would only be available in 2018 and 2019.

Compensation

Covered employees: Sec. 162(m) limits the deductibility of compensation paid to certain covered employees of publicly traded corporations. Current law defines a covered employee as the chief executive officer and the four most highly compensated officers (other than the CEO). The bill would revise the definition of a covered employee under Sec. 162(m) to include both the principal executive officer and the principal financial officer and would reduce the number of other officers included to the three most highly compensated officers for the tax year. The bill would also require that if an individual is a covered employee for any tax year (after 2016), that individual will remain a covered employee for all future years. The bill would also remove current exceptions for commissions and performance-based compensation.

The bill includes a transition rule so that the proposed changes would not apply to any remuneration under a written binding contract that was in effect on Nov. 2, 2017, and that was not later modified in any material respect.

Qualified equity grants: The bill would allow a qualified employee to elect to defer, for income tax purposes, the inclusion in income of the amount of income attributable to qualified stock transferred to the employee by the employer. An election to defer income inclusion with respect to qualified stock must be made no later than 30 days after the first time the employee’s right to the stock is substantially vested or is transferable, whichever occurs earlier.

Taxation of foreign income

The bill would provide a 100% deduction for the foreign-source portion of dividends received from “specified 10% owned foreign corporations” by domestic corporations that are U.S. shareholders of those foreign corporations within the meaning of Sec. 951(b). The conference report says that the term “dividend received” is intended to be interpreted broadly, consistently with the meaning of the phrases “amount received as dividends” and “dividends received” under Secs. 243 and 245, respectively.

A specified 10%-owned foreign corporation is any foreign corporation (other than a passive foreign investment company (PFIC) that is not also a controlled foreign corporation (CFC)) with respect to which any domestic corporation is a U.S. shareholder.

The deduction is not available for any dividend received by a U.S. shareholder from a CFC if the dividend is a hybrid dividend. A hybrid dividend is an amount received from a CFC for which a deduction would be allowed under this provision and for which the specified 10%-owned foreign corporation received a deduction (or other tax benefit) from any income, war profits, and excess profits taxes imposed by a foreign country.

Foreign tax credit: No foreign tax credit or deduction would be allowed for any taxes paid or accrued with respect to a dividend that qualifies for the deduction.

Holding period: A domestic corporation would not be permitted a deduction in respect of any dividend on any share of stock that is held by the domestic corporation for 365 days or less during the 731-day period beginning on the date that is 365 days before the date on which the share becomes ex-dividend with respect to the dividend.

Deemed repatriation: The bill generally requires that, for the last tax year beginning before Jan. 1, 2018, any U.S. shareholder of a specified foreign corporation must include in income its pro rata share of the accumulated post-1986 deferred foreign income of the corporation. For purposes of this provision, a specified foreign corporation is any foreign corporation in which a U.S. person owns a 10% voting interest. It excludes PFICs that are not also CFCs.

A portion of that pro rata share of foreign earnings is deductible; the amount of the deductible portion depends on whether the deferred earnings are held in cash or other assets. The deduction results in a reduced rate of tax with respect to income from the required inclusion of preeffective date earnings. The reduced rate of tax is 15.5% for cash and cash equivalents and 8% for all other earnings. A corresponding portion of the credit for foreign taxes is disallowed, thus limiting the credit to the taxable portion of the included income. The separate foreign tax credit limitation rules of current-law Sec. 904 apply, with coordinating rules. The increased tax liability generally may be paid over an eight-year period. Special rules are provided for S corporations and real estate investment trusts (REITs).

Foreign intangible income: The bill would provide domestic C corporations (that are not regulated investment companies or REITs) with a reduced tax rate on “foreign-derived intangible income” (FDII) and “global intangible low-taxed income” (GILTI). FDII is the portion of a domestic corporation’s intangible income that is derived from serving foreign markets, using a formula in a new Sec. 250. GILTI would be defined in a new Sec. 951A.

The effective tax rate on FDII would be 13.125% in tax years beginning after 2017 and before 2026 and 16.406% after 2025. The effective tax rate on GILTI would be 10.5% in tax years beginning after 2017 and before 2026 and 13.125% after 2025.

Definition of U.S. shareholder: The bill would amend the ownership attribution rules of Sec. 958(b) to expand the definition of “U.S. shareholder” to include a U.S. person who owns at least 10% of the value of the shares of the foreign corporation.

Alistair M. Nevius (Alistair.Nevius@aicpa-cima.com) is the Journal of Accountancy’s editor-in-chief, tax.

If you have questions about how the tax law changes will affect your business and what your next steps should be, please contact us online or call 816.741.7882 to set up an appointment to discuss details with one of our tax planning experts at McRuer CPAs. 

11/16/2017

McRuer CPAs 2017 Year-End Tax Guide

The 2017 calendar year is wrapping up quickly. While many of us have our eyes on the holiday season, this is the time to review your personal and business financial goals. Think of it as a  “checkup” to make certain you make the most effective, tax-savvy financial moves to end this year fiscally healthy.

"Timely financial planning is one of the best gifts you can give yourself as it will affect you and/or your business for years to come."

Even with significant tax reform expected for the 2018 tax season, we are still working under the federal and state tax laws that are on the books for 2017 taxes. We have compiled a quick tax tip guide to review some of the financial topics that we have determined to be the most important and relevant tax issues for most taxpayers for year-end review.

Click now to download the 2017 McRuer CPAs Year-End Tax Tips Guide.

Each individual and business is unique, so consider discussing your options with a professional in time to make any tax-saving moves that may help your particular needs. Please contact us if you have any questions or would like to schedule a year-end tax planning session with a McRuer CPAs Tax Planning Team Member.  If you are already a McRuer CPAs client, the year-end planning session is free.  Call us at: 816.741.7882.

04/13/2017

Taxes on Tips

While tips are discretionary and reflect a happy customer, taxes on tips are not optional and, if overlooked, can cause unhappy headaches for both taxpayers and their employers.

Tip jar picAll cash and non-cash tips are considered income and are subject to Federal income taxes. Tips include cash left by a customer, tips added to debit or credit card charges, and tips received from other employees or employer through tip sharing, tip pooling or other arrangements.

Employees who receive tips regularly are responsible for keeping a daily tip record and reporting all tips on their individual income tax return.  They must report tips that total $20 or more in any month by the 10th of the following month regardless of total wages and tips for the year.

If an employee doesn’t have or isn’t assigned a tip-tracking and reporting tool, the IRS provides a Daily Record of Tips (Form 4070) that an employee may use to document tips in the manner which is considered sufficient proof of tips received. Reliable proof of tip income would include copies of restaurant bills and credit card charges that show the amounts customers added as tips.

Automatic service charges that are often added onto bills are not considered tips, but rather are treated as regular wages so any taxes owed would be withheld by an employer on an employee’s next paycheck. Examples of service charges include things like bottle service charges, gratuity that is automatically added to a bill for large parties, delivery charges, and room service charges.

Employers must withhold income, social security and Medicare taxes on tips just as they would on other income earned by their employee.  If tips are not reported to an employer as required, an employee may face a penalty of 50% of the unpaid social security and Medicare taxes due.

If there are any unreported tips, a taxpayer must file a report of the income through another Form 4137 "Social Security and Medicare Tax on Unreported Tip Income" which helps the employee figure the amount that is subject to tax and how much is owed.

It can be a tedious process especially for workers who make money through a predetermined hourly wage with unpredictable tip income added to the total.  Workers who receive their tips at the end of each shift must make certain they record the tip amounts on their monthly tip report to their employers.  The taxes owed would then be deducted from their next paycheck. It’s possible that hourly wages may not cover the taxes owed. When this happens, any remaining taxes owed can paid out of the next paycheck through an employer agreement. This is the area where most problems occur as tax obligations on tips for one month may impact several paychecks.  It’s up to the employee to keep track of required tax payments so that there are no outstanding payroll taxes owed at year’s end.

If you need more help understanding how to record and report tip income, please contact one of our tax preparation experts at McRuer CPAs.

12/15/2015

Standard Mileage Rates Go Down in 2016

Standard mileage rateThe IRS has released the standard mileage rate allowances for the 2016 tax year. The deductible amounts will be less per mile than in 2015. 

The business mileage rate decreased 3.5 cents per mile and the medical, and moving expense rates decrease 4 cents per mile from the 2015 rates.

Click here to read the complete IRS release on the 2016 rates.

If you need more information or have a question, contact us at McRuer CPAs.

03/28/2015

Tax Tips on Tips

Consumers debate about how much they should tip a server at a restaurant with the general understanding that an average 10% to 15% tip indicates the service was good and up to a 20% tip
indicates it was exemplary.  As the food and service bill total is tallied, they usually don’t consider that the employee will be paying taxes on the tips.

Waiter with tip jarIRS rules require restaurant employees to report their tips daily from both cash and credit or debit card payments. Restaurant employees and employers must both pay social security and Medicare taxes on the tips, and the employee must pay income taxes on them just like other wages.

Employers are required to ensure that the total tip income reported by employees is at least equal to 8% of total receipts collected during each pay period.  The rules generally apply to food or beverage establishments with 10 or more employees. So, when a restaurant customer leaves no tip for a server, it can cost that employee and the entire wait team more than embarrassment.

03/13/2015

IRS Cuts Affect Tax Refunds and Audits

As we file 2014 individual tax returns and pay federal income taxes, it’s hard to imagine the IRS having on-going budget troubles. Yet, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen is requesting an additional $2 billion to keep up with service requests, timely refunds and enforcement actions such as tax audits on individuals and businesses.

1040 form with glasses and penniesIn a previous edition of The ReSource, we have given details of the delays and complaints associated with the decline in IRS customer service responses as the IRS has cut its staff and switched to more automated systems.  Now, political payback is cutting deep as the agency faces ongoing heat for mixing politics with taxes due to allegations of targeting conservative groups and paying for expensive “training” retreats.

Last month, Congress approved a $10.9 billion budget for the IRS for fiscal year 2015, which ends in June.  It is the lowest level of funding for the embattled agency since 2008 with total budget amounts declining $1.2 Billion in the last 5 years. 

Whether a taxpayer thinks there should be more or less of the IRS, the budget push-me-pull-you debate is affecting the taxpayer’s experience in a number of ways.  Commissioner Koskinen describes it as “changes” in how the IRS will do business with taxpayers this tax season.

Here are some of the issues that may impact you directly:

Refund Delays:  Nearly 8 out of 10 tax filers receive a federal tax refund. The average amount paid is close to $2,800, according to the most recent filing statistics.  Refunds from electronically filed returns are usually processed in about 3 weeks, but the IRS warns staff cutbacks have increased processing time up to an average of 5 weeks. Taxpayers who file paper returns are now being told their refund check might not be processed for 7 weeks.

Audit Declines:  The number of audits in 2014 declined 6% overall from the previous year while experts cannot agree on what the audit numbers will be in 2015.  The audit predictions range from roughly 1% to 6% of total individual and business tax returns. 

Some taxpayers may be relieved that the risk of being audited has decreased slightly, but the conclusions are based on the percent of audits compared to the number of tax returns filed.  More fraudulent tax returns are being filed each year due to tax-related identity theft.  Fewer audits may mean it will be more difficult to detect this kind of tax fraud just as new enforcement agencies are gaining steam.

Audit Hassles: Even though last year’s audit numbers report a decline, taxpayers complain they are receiving more correspondence audits, which are computer-generated letters triggered by an automated tax form-matching program.  The correspondence letters request timely answers, but there are mounting frustrations due to the inability to connect with a “live” IRS auditor.

Hiring Freeze:  IRS officials say budget cutbacks and the resulting hiring freeze will result in nearly 4,000 fewer full-time employees at the agency by the end of June.  When those numbers are added to the headcount losses in the last 6 years, the IRS has lost nearly 17,000 full-time workers.

Less Taxpayer Help:  Officials’ statements warn that fewer than half the taxpayers that call the agency for help will be able to get through to an actual person.

Technology Timing:  Updates that were in line for streamlining IRS internal and processing systems are being delayed to avoid taking up staff time for training and testing the new systems.  Among the updates included the latest taxpayer protection tools against identity theft.

Possible Shutdown:  Commissioner Koskinen says the agency may implement a money-saving temporary shutdown as a last resort.  To minimize disruptions, he says the agency may close for two days after the main tax-filing season, possibly in May or June.

The best taxpayer defense is to make certain your federal income tax return and necessary documentation is mistake-free to avoid audits and delays. 

If you have questions about how the IRS cuts may affect your federal income tax filing, contact us at McRuer CPAs for more information.

02/21/2015

How to Know When You Need a CPA

The DIY (Do It Yourself) industry is flourishing these days.  This trend also extends to accounting and income tax services.  The availability of affordable computing power, improved entry-level accounting and income tax software, and cloud-based applications and storage options are attractive because they may help you save money by doing it yourself.  Added to that is some very effective advertising claiming that at the push of a button your business accounting and income tax filings will be worry free.  However, be warned; our clients often turn to us when their experience with DIY solutions show the ease and efficiency of using these products has been oversold.

In today’s highly regulated environment, innocent omissions and mistakes from simply not knowing An-accountant-helping-clientshow transactions should be recorded, or how to properly comply with new federal, state or local tax
law, can be costly, and sometimes devastating.  Instead of spending time increasing sales, improving processes and growing their businesses, some business owners say they grow frustrated and waste time trying to learn to use and update the latest software as well as keep up with filing deadlines and regulations by themselves.  That’s when they call us.

Let’s consider how engaging professional help with your business accounting and finances can pay big benefits that will help your bottom line both short-term and long-term. 

For those business owners who have a solid accounting or bookkeeping background and a good understanding of business finances, with McRuer CPAs’ MyMcRuer/BackOffice service offering you may benefit by a combination of some DIY and some professional on-demand services.

MyMcRuer/BackOffice helps business owners control costs by personally managing their business’s books.  In addition, when a difficult issue or a question arises, they have access to a local experienced accounting professional who will view the issue real time to identify the problem and quickly provide a solution.  Then as the business grows and its operations need more of an owner's or manager’s time, a smooth transition can be made to full-time professional accountants and bookkeepers who already know the business.

If you intend to grow your business, the benefits of professional accounting services cannot be overestimated.  Is it time that you utilized a professional for your combined personal and business tax preparation?  When is it cost effective to hire an accounting firm’s experts to help with your business accounting and bookkeeping needs?

Consider the following as a mental checklist to help you find an answer to the question: 

How Do I Know When I Need a Professional Accountant or CPA?

You know you need a professional accountant or CPA when…

(circle the sentence numbers that apply to you and when finished add up the total number of sentences that describe your financial situation)

  1. You are considering investing significant time, money and passion into a business idea. Before you “take the leap” you want input about your business plan from an independent professional who will review the numbers and help you analyze your idea’s future growth potential.
  2. You are starting a new business and want to select the best business structure that fits the marketplace, your proficiency and your goals.  You have been told there are different types of business entities that may limit your personal liability for your business activities, but you don’t understand the tax consequences of this decision.
  3. Your income and deductions have changed and you no longer file a simple tax return, or you suspect you must make quarterly estimated tax payments.
  4. You need new or additional business financing, and your lender or insuror is requesting financial information that must be provided by a third party.
  5. You want to better understand your business’s financial information, and use it to improve profitability, inventory management, and cash flow.
  6. You need more information in order to prepare to sell your business.
  7. You are shutting down your business.
  8. You hire other people to help you, and you need information about employees versus independent contractors.
  9. You have become responsible for another person’s affairs, either during their life or after their passing.
  10. The IRS or another regulatory agency has contacted you about an upcoming audit or other collection actions.
  11. You wish to develop and act on a plan to provide for your financial future, including saving for retirement, your childrens’ education, and/or other obligations.
  12. You want to ensure you have the best estate plan in place by understanding the tax, financial and time-based consequences of that plan.
  13. You want to create a succession plan for passing your business on to the next person when you’re ready to retire or sell.
  14. You want to take responsibility for your business and personal financial affairs, and want a trusted advisor to help you succeed.
  15. You must prepare and file Forms W2 and 1099 annually.
  16. You need to understand your best choices on property purchase versus equipment leasing.

How many of the above statements apply to you?

These are just a few of the practical reasons that you need a professional accountant on your business’ financial team.  If you circled 3 to 5 of the above business and personal accounting points, it’s probably time you considered using an upgraded business accounting tool that provides a live accountant when you need one.  If you circled more than 5, it’s time you connect with a professional accountant long-term with comprehensive services and experience to ensure business success.

Accountant over shoulderConsider using a CPA (Certified Professional Accountant) that is experienced and trained specifically to be your business and personal financial planner, management consultant, management information specialist, business consultant and more. 

Yet, don’t forget to consider whether the professional you bring on board is someone you get along with personally.  Financial decisions are a reflection of the production and goals of real people like you who are working to make profits in order to enjoy the life you love.  It’s important to find an accountant who will work well with your business team and shares your concerns about accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and long-term effectiveness.

When you know you need an accountant, we’re here.

At McRuer CPAs, we know business “numbers” are personal and we make the extra effort to match the personalities of our professional accountants with you and your business team.  You may discover the latest online tools with the on-demand help of a CPA are the best choice for you and your business.  Maybe it's time to have a full-time accounting professional join your team?  How do you what to do?

Let’s find out what will work best for you.  Contact us for a strategic planning session by calling 816.741.7882 or contact us through our confidential online resource.  We’ll review your goals and help you make the best choice.

02/19/2015

Tax Software vs Professional Accountants

As we enter into the peak of tax preparation season, we are often asked about the difference between using tax preparation software and using the services of a professional accountant.  Today there are dozens of preparation software options online and in software packages that can help a taxpayer complete their tax return.  This as today's tax liabilities and concerns are growing more complicated than they've ever been. 

1040 form with glasses and penniesA recent Wall Street Journal article revealed as taxpayers try out new tax software tools, they are making more and more mistakes.  Often, it has to do with not knowing the right questions to ask to discover their best options.  Many times, incorrectly entered numbers cause automatic equations to produce the wrong totals.  

Don't misunderstand, there are good reasons to choose tax software to help you complete your income tax return on your own.  There are also good reasons to choose a professional accountant.  We came across an interesting and concise article online on Investopedia that explains your options clearly.

Here is that article for your consideration as you choose the best steps to take regarding the preparation of your federal and state income tax returns. 

Tax Software Vs. An Accountant: Which Is Right For You?    By Jason Steele | Updated January 29, 2014

""With every important job comes the question of whether or not individuals should do it themselves or hire a professional. While the ever-improving selection of tax preparation software certainly makes it easier to do your own taxes, it has hardly put Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) and other personal tax preparers out of business. 

The Advantages of Using Tax Software
Price
There is no way around the fact that you will pay less for a software package than you will to hire a CPA or another qualified tax professional. The price of tax preparation software ranges from the $10 to $120 range to websites that offer the service for free. On the other hand, the least expensive tax preparers will cost at least $100 and a CPA is likely to charge at least twice that amount. The upfront savings of using tax software over an accountant is one of the most attractive benefits of filing your own taxes. 

The Advantages of Using Tax Software
Price
There is no way around the fact that you will pay less for a software package than you will to hire a CPA or another qualified tax professional. The price of tax preparation software ranges from the $10 to $120 range to websites that offer the service for free. On the other hand, the least expensive tax preparers will cost at least $100 and a CPA is likely to charge at least twice that amount. The upfront savings of using tax software over an accountant is one of the most attractive benefits of filing your own taxes. 

The Benefits of Hiring a Professional Accountant
Better Software
Accountants pay around $1,000 to $6,000 for their software, which is far more sophisticated than the products sold to consumers. These more advanced programs have the ability to quickly scan your information and organize line items and forms correctly. By automating much of the data entry and organization, there's less chance for human error to hurt your tax return.

Human Touch
Like a good family doctor that knows your medical history, you can develop a relationship with an accountant so that he or she understands your family's financial situation and future goals. According to Wehner, who has been preparing taxes for 45 years, "A tax professional is often able to make valuable tax savings suggestions that a software program just can't anticipate." The value of this advice can easily exceed the additional cost of consulting with a professional. For example, a tax accountant can provide you advice on tax-friendly ways to save for your children's education, or how to reduce taxes on your capital gains.

Accountants Can Answer Your Questions Year Round
As a trusted professional, a good accountant will be able to answer important questions that arise not just during your annual consultation, but at other times during the year.

Calculator help and form 1040A CPA Saves You Time When Handling Complicated Issues
Taxpayers who find themselves at the center of complicated business and investment matters may even have the skill to sort through their taxes on their own, but is it worth their time? A professional tax preparer is so familiar with the system; he or she can quickly and easily accomplish tasks that might take even skilled taxpayers hours of research. For busy non-tax professionals, their time can generally be better spent earning money in their area of expertise. Even if your tax situation is straightforward, hiring a professional will save you the time and stress of doing your taxes.

The Bottom Line
Ultimately, there is no universally correct answer to the question of hiring a tax professional or doing your taxes yourself with software. Your comfort and familiarity with IRS rules will be part of your decision, but the complexity of your finances should be the key deciding factor. Those with a single employer and few investments may save hundreds of dollars by preparing their own taxes, while those with business income or rental properties will find the expense of hiring an accountant to be worth their peace of mind and potential tax saving.""

##  So, as we add one final thought to the article above, consider that the more complicated your taxes are, the more likely you need comprehensive accounting services and an accounting professional to help you make the best decisions. For us at McRuer CPAs, it's all about making certain you pay no more taxes than you owe.

If you have any questions, or would like to review your income tax situation with an accountant, contact us at McRuer CPAs to set up a consultation.  We'll take a look and provide you options so you can make the best choice.  Call us:  816.741.7882 or contact us online.

 

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