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11/16/2017

McRuer CPAs 2017 Year-End Tax Guide

The 2017 calendar year is wrapping up quickly. While many of us have our eyes on the holiday season, this is the time to review your personal and business financial goals. Think of it as a  “checkup” to make certain you make the most effective, tax-savvy financial moves to end this year fiscally healthy.

"Timely financial planning is one of the best gifts you can give yourself as it will affect you and/or your business for years to come."

Even with significant tax reform expected for the 2018 tax season, we are still working under the federal and state tax laws that are on the books for 2017 taxes. We have compiled a quick tax tip guide to review some of the financial topics that we have determined to be the most important and relevant tax issues for most taxpayers for year-end review.

Click now to download the 2017 McRuer CPAs Year-End Tax Tips Guide.

Each individual and business is unique, so consider discussing your options with a professional in time to make any tax-saving moves that may help your particular needs. Please contact us if you have any questions or would like to schedule a year-end tax planning session with a McRuer CPAs Tax Planning Team Member.  If you are already a McRuer CPAs client, the year-end planning session is free.  Call us at: 816.741.7882.

11/03/2017

Details of House Tax Reform Bill

As you may know the House Ways and Means Committee has released the Tax Cut and Jobs Act (H.R. 1) providing some new tax reform provisions while incorporating many of the details included in the Republican-backed tax reform package submitted in September. There are a number of tax issues that may affect you, should they be approved following the budget debate process in Washington. Those details include changes, updates and protections for various business and individual tax rates, deductions and retirement plan contributions.

Tax-Reform with flagThe Journal of Accountancy has published an article with a review of the provisions of the new tax proposal draft (as submitted before debate and possible amendments) that offers a review of many of the details that we hope will be informative and helpful to you as you begin thinking of year-end tax planning.

 Note: his article has been published by the Journal of Accountancy, a professional’s resource for information regarding accounting and taxation issues.  It is the primary publication, as edited and released by the Association of International Certified Professional Accountants. It is one of many resources we use at McRuer CPAs to keep us informed about issues that affect the businesses and individuals we serve.  This particular news information article regards the consideration of a legislative proposal. Such initial legislation is subjected to debate and amendments. Therefore, this first review of the tax reform legislation draft is to be considered as a preliminary summary and first look at the new tax reform proposal and may not be the actual legislation approved by lawmakers over time.

For a look at the actual bill itself, noting that the language will likely be edited in several ways before passing, click here.

Details of Tax Reform Legislation Revealed

By Sally Schreiber, J.D.; Paul Bonner; and Alistair Nevius, J.D.

The House Ways and Means Committee released draft tax reform legislation on Thursday. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, H.R. 1, incorporates many of the provisions listed in the Republicans’ September tax reform framework while providing new details. Budget legislation passed in October would allow for the tax reform bill to cut federal government revenue by up to $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years and still be enacted under the Senate’s budget reconciliation rules, which would require only 51 votes in the Senate for passage. The Joint Committee on Taxation issued an estimate of the revenue effects of the bill on Thursday showing a net total revenue loss of $1.487 trillion over 10 years.

The bill features new tax rates, a lower limit on the deductibility of home mortgage interest, the repeal of most deductions for individuals, and full expensing of depreciable assets by businesses, among its many provisions.

Lawmakers had reportedly been discussing lowering the contribution limits for Sec. 401(k) plans, but the bill does not include any changes to those limits.

The Senate Finance Committee is reportedly working on its own version of tax reform legislation, which is expected to be unveiled next week. It is unclear how much that bill will differ from the House bill released on Thursday.

Individuals

Tax rates: The bill would impose four tax rates on individuals: 12%, 25%, 35%, and 39.6%, effective for tax years after 2017. The current rates are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35%, and 39.6%. The 25% bracket would start at $45,000 of taxable income for single taxpayers and at $90,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly.

The 35% bracket would start at $200,000 of taxable income for single taxpayers and at $260,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly. And the 39.6% bracket would apply to taxable income over $500,000 for single taxpayers and $1 million for joint filers.

Standard deduction and personal exemption: The standard deduction would increase from $6,350 to $12,200 for single taxpayers and from $12,700 to $24,400 for married couples filing jointly, effective for tax years after 2017. Single filers with at least one qualifying child would get an $18,300 standard deduction. These amounts will be adjusted for inflation after 2019. However, the personal exemption would be eliminated.

Deductions: Most deductions would be repealed, including the medical expense deduction, the alimony deduction, and the casualty loss deduction (except for personal casualty losses associated with special disaster relief legislation). The deduction for tax preparation fees would also be eliminated.

However, the deductions for charitable contributions and for mortgage interest would be retained. The mortgage interest deduction on existing mortgages would remain the same; for newly purchased residences (that is, for debt incurred after Nov. 2, 2017), the limit on deductibility would be reduced to $500,000 of acquisition indebtedness from the current $1.1 million. The overall limitation of itemized deductions would also be repealed.

Some rules for charitable contributions would change for tax years beginning after 2017. Among those changes, the current 50% limitation would be increased to 60%.

The deduction for state and local income or sales taxes would be eliminated, except that income or sales taxes paid in carrying out a trade or business or producing income would still be deductible. State and local real property taxes would continue to be deductible, but only up to $10,000. These provisions would be effective for tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017.

Credits: Various credits would also be repealed by the bill, including the adoption tax credit, the credit for the elderly and the totally and permanently disabled, the credit associated with mortgage credit certificates, and the credit for plug-in electric vehicles.

The child tax credit would be increased from $1,000 to $1,600, and a $300 credit would be allowed for nonchild dependents. A new “family flexibility” credit of $300 would be allowed for other dependents. The $300 credit for nonchild dependents and the family flexibility credit would expire after 2022.

The American opportunity tax credit, the Hope scholarship credit, and the lifetime learning credit would be combined into one credit, providing a 100% tax credit on the first $2,000 of eligible higher education expenses and a 25% credit on the next $2,000, effective for tax years after 2017. Contributions to Coverdell education savings accounts (except rollover contributions) would be prohibited after 2017, but taxpayers would be allowed to roll over money in their Coverdell ESAs into a Sec. 529 plan.

The bill would also repeal the deduction for interest on education loans and the deduction for qualified tuition and related expenses, as well as the exclusion for interest on U.S. savings bonds used to pay qualified higher education expenses, the exclusion for qualified tuition reduction programs, and the exclusion for employer-provided education assistance programs.

Other taxes: The bill would repeal the alternative minimum tax (AMT).

The estate tax would be repealed after 2023 (with the step-up in basis for inherited property retained). In the meantime, the estate tax exclusion amount would double (currently it is $5,490,000, indexed for inflation). The top gift tax rate would be lowered to 35%.

Passthrough income: A portion of net income distributions from passthrough entities would be taxed at a maximum rate of 25%, instead of at ordinary individual income tax rates, effective for tax years after 2017. The bill includes provisions to prevent individuals from converting wage income into passthrough distributions. Passive activity income would always be eligible for the 25% rate.

For income from nonpassive business activities (including wages), owners and shareholders generally could elect to treat 30% of the income as eligible for the 25% rate; the other 70% would be taxed at ordinary income rates. Alternatively, owners and shareholders could apply a facts-and-circumstances formula.

However, for specified service activities, the applicable percentage that would be eligible for the 25% rate would be zero. These activities are those defined in Sec. 1202(e)(3)(A) (any trade or business involving the performance of services in the fields of health, law, engineering, architecture, accounting, actuarial science, performing arts, consulting, athletics, financial services, brokerage services, or any trade or business where the principal asset of such trade or business is the reputation or skill of one or more of its employees), including investing, trading, or dealing in securities, partnership interests, or commodities.

Business provisions

A flat corporate rate: The bill would replace the current four-tier schedule of corporate rates (15%, 25%, 34%, and 35%, with a $75,001 threshold for the 34% rate) with a flat 20% rate (25% for personal services corporations). The corporate AMT is repealed along with the individual AMT.

Higher expensing levels: The bill would provide 100% expensing of qualified property acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017, and before Jan. 1, 2023 (with an additional year for longer-production-period property). It would also increase tenfold the Sec. 179 expensing limitation ceiling and phaseout threshold to $5 million and $20 million, respectively, both indexed for inflation.

Cash accounting method more widely available: The bill would increase to $25 million the current $5 million average gross receipts ceiling for corporations generally permitted to use the cash method of accounting and extend it to businesses with inventories. Such businesses also would be exempted from the uniform capitalization (UNICAP) rules. The exemption from the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts of $10 million in average gross receipts would also be increased to $25 million.

NOLs, other deductions eliminated or limited: Deductions of net operating losses (NOLs) would be limited to 90% of taxable income. NOLs would have an indefinite carryforward period, but carrybacks would no longer be available for most businesses. Carryforwards for losses arising after 2017 would be increased by an interest factor. Other deductions also would be curtailed or eliminated:

  • Instead of the current provisions under Sec. 163(j) limiting a deduction for business interest paid to a related party or basing a limitation on the taxpayer’s debt-equity ratio or a percentage of adjusted taxable income, the bill would impose a limit of 30% of adjusted taxable income for all businesses with more than $25 million in average gross receipts.
  • The Sec. 199 domestic production activities deduction would be repealed.
  • Deductions for entertainment, amusement, or recreation activities as a business expense would be generally eliminated, as would employee fringe benefits for transportation and certain other perks deemed personal in nature rather than directly related to a trade or business, except to the extent that such benefits are treated as taxable compensation to an employee (or includible in gross income of a recipient who is not an employee).

Like-kind exchanges limited to real estate: The bill would limit like-kind exchange treatment to real estate, but a transition rule would allow completion of currently pending Sec. 1031 exchanges of personal property.

Business and energy credits curtailed: Offsetting some of the revenue loss resulting from the lower top corporate tax rate, the bill would repeal a number of business credits, including:

  • The work opportunity tax credit (Sec. 51).
  • The credit for employer-provided child care (Sec. 45F).
  • The credit for rehabilitation of qualified buildings or certified historic structures (Sec. 47).
  • The Sec. 45D new markets tax credit. Credits allocated before 2018 could still be used in up to seven subsequent years.
  • The credit for providing access to disabled individuals (Sec. 44).
  • The credit for enhanced oil recovery (Sec. 43).
  • The credit for producing oil and gas from marginal wells (Sec. 45I)

Other credits would be modified, including those for a portion of employer Social Security taxes paid with respect to employee tips (Sec. 45B), for electricity produced from certain renewable resources (Sec. 45), for production from advanced nuclear power facilities (Sec. 45J), and the investment tax credit (Sec. 46) for eligible energy property. The Sec. 25D residential energy-efficient property credit, which expired for property placed in service after 2016, would be extended retroactively through 2022 but reduced beginning in 2020.

Bond provisions: Several types of tax-exempt bonds would become taxable:

  • Private activity bonds would no longer be tax-exempt. The bill would include in taxpayer income interest on such bonds issued after 2017.
  • Interest on bonds issued to finance construction of, or capital expenditures for, a professional sports stadium would be taxable.
  • Interest on advance refunding bonds would be taxable.
  • Current provisions relating to tax credit bonds would generally be repealed. Holders and issuers would continue receiving tax credits and payments for tax credit bonds already issued, but no new bonds could be issued.

Insurance provisions: The bill would introduce several revenue-raising provisions modifying special rules applicable to the insurance industry. These include bringing life insurers’ NOL carryover rules into conformity with those of other businesses.

Compensation provisions: The bill would impose new limits on the deductibility of certain highly paid employees’ pay, including, for the first time, those of tax-exempt organizations.

  • Nonqualified deferred compensation would be subject to tax in the tax year in which it is no longer subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture. Current law would apply to existing nonqualified deferred compensation arrangements until the last tax year beginning before 2026.
  • The exceptions for commissions and performance-based compensation from the Sec. 162(m) $1 million limitation on deductibility of compensation of certain top employees of publicly traded corporations would be repealed. The bill would also include more employees in the definition of “covered employee” subject to the limit.
  • The bill would impose similar rules on executives of organizations exempt from tax under Sec. 501(a), with a 20% excise tax on compensation exceeding $1 million paid to any of a tax-exempt organization’s five highest-paid employees, including “excess parachute payments.”

Foreign income and persons

Deduction for foreign-source dividends received by 10% U.S. corporate owners: The bill would add a new section to the Code, Sec. 245A, which replaces the foreign tax credit for dividends received by a U.S. corporation with a dividend-exemption system. This provision would be effective for distributions made after 2017. This provision is designed to eliminate the “lock-out” effect that encourages U.S. companies not to bring earnings back to the United States.

The bill would also repeal Sec. 902, the indirect foreign tax credit provision, and amend Sec. 960 to coordinate with the bill’s dividends-received provision. Thus, no foreign tax credit or deduction would be allowed for any taxes (including withholding taxes) paid or accrued with respect to any dividend to which the dividend exemption of the bill would apply.

Elimination of U.S. tax on reinvestments in U.S. property: Under current law, a foreign subsidiary’s undistributed earnings that are reinvested in U.S. property are subject to current U.S. tax. The bill would amend Sec. 956(a) to eliminate this tax on reinvestments in the United States for tax years of foreign corporations beginning after Dec. 31, 2017. This provision would remove the disincentive from reinvesting foreign earnings in the United States.

Limitation on loss deductions for 10%-owned foreign corporations: In a companion provision to the deduction for foreign-source dividends, the bill would amend Sec. 961 and add new Sec. 91 to require a U.S. parent to reduce the basis of its stock in a foreign subsidiary by the amount of any exempt dividends received by the U.S. parent from its foreign subsidiary, but only for determining loss, not gain. The provision also requires a U.S. corporation that transfers substantially all of the assets of a foreign branch to a foreign subsidiary to include in the U.S. corporation’s income the amount of any post-2017 losses that were incurred by the branch. The provisions would be effective for distributions or transfers made after 2017.

Repatriation provision: The bill would amend Sec. 956 to provide that U.S. shareholders owning at least 10% of a foreign subsidiary will include in income for the subsidiary’s last tax year beginning before 2018 the shareholder’s pro rata share of the net post-1986 historical earnings and profits (E&P) of the foreign subsidiary to the extent that E&P have not been previously subject to U.S. tax, determined as of Nov. 2, 2017, or Dec. 31, 2017 (whichever is higher). The portion of E&P attributable to cash or cash equivalents would be taxed at a 12% rate; the remainder would be taxed at a 5% rate. U.S. shareholders can elect to pay the tax liability over eight years in equal annual installments of 12.5% of the total tax due.

Income from production activities sourced: The bill would amend Sec. 863(b) to provide that income from the sale of inventory property produced within and sold outside the United States (or vice versa) is allocated solely on the basis of the production activities for the inventory.

Changes to Subpart F rules: The bill would repeal the foreign shipping income and foreign base company oil-related income rules. It would also add an inflation adjustment to the de minimis exception to the foreign base company income rules and make permanent the lookthrough rule, under which passive income one foreign subsidiary receives from a related foreign subsidiary generally is not includible in the taxable income of the U.S. parent, provided that income was not subject to current U.S. tax or effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business.

Under the bill, a U.S. corporation would be treated as constructively owning stock held by its foreign shareholder for purposes of determining CFC status. The bill would also eliminate the requirements that a U.S. parent corporation must control a foreign subsidiary for 30 days before Subpart F inclusions apply.

Base erosion provisions: Under the bill, a U.S. parent of one or more foreign subsidiaries would be subject to current U.S. tax on 50% of the U.S. parent’s foreign high returns—the excess of the U.S. parent’s foreign subsidiaries’ aggregate net income over a routine return (7% plus the federal short-term rate) on the foreign subsidiaries’ aggregate adjusted bases in depreciable tangible property, adjusted downward for interest expense.

The deductible net interest expense of a U.S. corporation that is a member of an international financial reporting group would be limited to the extent the U.S. corporation’s share of the group’s global net interest expense exceeds 110% of the U.S. corporation’s share of the group’s global earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA).

Payments (other than interest) made by a U.S. corporation to a related foreign corporation that are deductible, includible in costs of goods sold, or includible in the basis of a depreciable or amortizable asset would be subject to a 20% excise tax, unless the related foreign corporation elected to treat the payments as income effectively connected with the conduct of a U.S. trade or business. Consequently, the foreign corporation’s net profits (or gross receipts if no election is made) with respect to those payments would be subject to full U.S. tax, eliminating the potential U.S. tax benefit otherwise achieved.

Exempt organizations

Clarification that state and local entities are subject to unrelated business income tax (UBIT): The bill would amend Sec. 511 to clarify that all state and local entities including pension plans are subject to the Sec. 511 tax on unrelated business income (UBI).

Exclusion from UBIT for research income: The act would amend the Code to provide that income from research is exempt from UBI only if the results are freely made available to the public.

Reduction in excise tax paid by private foundations: The bill would repeal the current rules that apply either a 1% or 2% tax on private foundations’ net investment income with a 1.4% rate for tax years beginning after 2017.

Modification of the Johnson Amendment: Effective on the date of enactment, the bill would amend Sec. 501 to permit statements about political campaigns to be made by religious organizations.

Sally P. Schreiber (Sally.Schreiber@aicpa-cima.com) and Paul Bonner (Paul.Bonner@aicpa-cima.com) are JofA senior editors, and Alistair M. Nevius (Alistair.Nevius@aicpa-cima.com) is the JofA’s editor-in-chief, tax.

05/01/2017

Trump Tax Reform Goals: Press Release and Articles

Trump at microphonePresident Donald Trump has released a single-page summary of the goals and priorities of his tax reform package.  We have a copy of the document to share with you as well as links to various articles on the subject available online for your review. While specifics of an actual proposal are not yet available, we hope the information and various media reviews will help clarify the intended direction of a tax reform proposal from the perspective of the White House. Please contact one of our tax planning experts if you have questions as to how the proposed tax reforms may affect your individual and/or business tax planning strategies.

Click on the information lines below to download articles and postings:

Actual Media Release from the White House

White House Press Briefing on Proposed Tax Reform Goals

Various Media Articles With Responses and Opinions   (Postings of these links to articles should not infer that McRuer CPAs is in agreement with any or all of the following media responses. The list is simply a way to provide you more information from various views.)

Journal of Accountancy from the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA.org)

FOX Business News

Wall Street Journal

New York Times

Bloomberg Review

The National Review

CNN Money

Kansas City Star

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jefferson City News Tribune

01/09/2017

2017 Mileage Rates for Business Use of a Vehicle

As reported by the Journal of Accountancy: The IRS has announced  the optional standard mileage rates for business use of a vehicle will drop slightly in 2017, the second consecutive annual decline. For business use of a car, van, pickup truck, or panel truck, the rate for 2017 will be 53.5 cents per mile, down from 54 cents per mile in 2016. Taxpayers can use the optional standard mileage rates to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile.

Driving for medical or moving purposes may be deducted at 17 cents per mile, which is two cents lower than for 2016. The rate for service to a charitable organization is unchanged, set by statute at 14 cents per mile (Sec. 170(i)).

The portion of the business standard mileage rate that is treated as depreciation will be 25 cents per mile for 2017, one cent higher than for 2016.

To compute the allowance under a fixed and variable rate (FAVR) plan, the maximum standard automobile cost is $27,900 for 2017 (down from $28,000 for 2016) for automobiles (not including trucks and vans) and $31,300 for trucks and vans (an increase of $300 from 2016). Under a FAVR plan, a standard amount is deemed substantiated for an employer’s reimbursement to employees for expenses they incur in driving their vehicle in performing services as an employee for the employer.

See more at: http://www.journalofaccountancy.com/news/2016/dec/irs-2017-mileage-rates-201615701.html#sthash.sxZ6OHvw.dpuf

03/09/2016

State-Managed Retirement Savings Accounts Now in 27 States

Retirement jar 1Several states are working on plans to help workers save for retirement. The Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that only about half of full-time workers employed by small businesses or organizations have access to an employer-based retirement plan. By comparison, the numbers show 85 percent of Americans who work for employers with 100 or more employees do have access to an employer-provided retirement plan or benefits program.

To help close the gap, some states are providing access for eligible workers to state-managed individual retirement accounts funded by automatic deductions from the worker’s paychecks.  For example, in 2017 Illinois will launch the Secure Choice Retirement Savings Program, which gives workers a retirement plan option. Full-time employees working for qualified businesses (who do not already provide retirement benefits) will be automatically enrolled into a direct deduction retirement savings plan with a minimum three percent deduction each paycheck.  The employee can choose to have more withheld or to opt out of the program entirely. The money is deposited into a Roth IRA.

The Pension Rights Center in Washington, DC has been monitoring the development of state-administered retirement plans for private-sector workers. It shows that currently 27 states have already approved or are debating proposals to launch state-based retirement plans including: Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

Last September, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) published a report detailing how “half of private sector workers, especially those who are low-income or employed by small firms, lack coverage from a workplace retirement savings program primarily because they do not have access.” The GAO is recommending ways that the federal government can make it easier for states to manage such plans, while not placing a financial or administrative burden on small business.

12/18/2015

2015 Tax Extenders Summary

After months of uncertainty and speculation, it appears Congress has finally sufficiently collaborated to propose the “Tax Extenders” legislation in which a large number of expired tax provisions will be extended, some permanently.  Some tax credits that would be made permanent include the Child Tax Credit, the American Opportunity Tax Credit and the Earned Income Tax Credit

Of particular interest, it appears Section 179 will be permanently fixed at $500,000 of qualified assets for years in which taxpayers place in service up to $2,000,000 of assets.  For amounts above $2,000,000, the Section 179 deduction is reduced dollar for dollar until $2,500,000, at which time no asset additions are eligible.  Bonus depreciation is temporarily extended at 50% for 2015, 2016 and 2017, then stepped down to 40% in 2018 and 30% in 2019, after which time it is scheduled to be completely phased out.

To find out more information about the specifics of the legislation, here are some online resources:

If you have any questions about how these tax extenders may affect you or your business bottom line, please contact us at McRuer CPAs by calling 816.741.7882 or click here to connect with us online.

12/15/2015

Standard Mileage Rates Go Down in 2016

Standard mileage rateThe IRS has released the standard mileage rate allowances for the 2016 tax year. The deductible amounts will be less per mile than in 2015. 

The business mileage rate decreased 3.5 cents per mile and the medical, and moving expense rates decrease 4 cents per mile from the 2015 rates.

Click here to read the complete IRS release on the 2016 rates.

If you need more information or have a question, contact us at McRuer CPAs.

03/28/2015

Tax Tips on Tips

Consumers debate about how much they should tip a server at a restaurant with the general understanding that an average 10% to 15% tip indicates the service was good and up to a 20% tip
indicates it was exemplary.  As the food and service bill total is tallied, they usually don’t consider that the employee will be paying taxes on the tips.

Waiter with tip jarIRS rules require restaurant employees to report their tips daily from both cash and credit or debit card payments. Restaurant employees and employers must both pay social security and Medicare taxes on the tips, and the employee must pay income taxes on them just like other wages.

Employers are required to ensure that the total tip income reported by employees is at least equal to 8% of total receipts collected during each pay period.  The rules generally apply to food or beverage establishments with 10 or more employees. So, when a restaurant customer leaves no tip for a server, it can cost that employee and the entire wait team more than embarrassment.

02/27/2015

Have a Complicated Tax Return? Here's What to Do

Is preparing your own income tax return becoming more complicated every year? How do you know when it's time to hire a professional?

Taxpayer with stack of papersConsider these questions as you determine whether you should turn to an accountant to help you file your tax return:  

Are you confident you know enough about new laws that apply to your income tax filing?  

Have you had a major life event that will affect how you file your return such as; the change or loss of a job, buying or selling a home, addition or loss of a dependent, education expenses, borrowing money from an IRA, buying or selling a business, experiencing a major illness, or going through a divorce?

Are you certain you know what forms to use? Are you confident you are calculating deductions and credits properly?  Are you stressing out over what you're finding out about your income and what you don't know about your income taxes?  Have you received a letter from the IRS about an income tax issue?

If any of the above questions apply to you, it's time to talk to an accountant who is experienced and qualified to handle even the most complicated tax return.

What to Do About Complicated Income Taxes

When you realize that you can no longer prepare your income taxes on your own, don't panic. Instead, do your best to get organized to present your income tax "story" to a professional.  This means get your documents in order.  Collect any documents that report income you have earned in the past year as well as any proof of any federal, state and local taxes you may have already paid.

Gather up receipts and statements that will document your expenses that may qualify as tax deductions or result in a tax credit.  Categorize the documents by subject and date to help the tax professional you select better understand your financial picture and how it applies to your tax obligation.

Find copies of your tax returns from the past two years to show your chosen tax professional so that a thorough review of your tax filing history can be made.  There may be something that was missed that could save you tax dollars or cost you in the long-run.  The sooner the issues are identifed, the better.

Note: Complicated tax issues and questions do not go away if you simply ignore them.  Bring any tax-related question or issue you have with you to your appointment with a tax preparation expert. They will help you understand the significance and meaning of IRS letters or other documents. Sometimes taxpayers ignore important notices because they are hard to understand or feel that the information is wrong or doesn't apply to them, but that can be a costly mistake. 

Graphic with ad infoWith tax laws and regulations changing on a regular basis, it is essential that you use a tax professional who fully understands these changes and how to apply them to your unique situation.

Without expert tax preparation assistance, many taxpayers who fill out their own returns make unnecessary errors either through miscalculation of numbers or through not knowing the proper forms to file.  All of this can cost plenty in fees, penalties and interest payments.  So, the cost of making mistakes and omissions should be carefully considered against the cost of bringing a professional on board to help you with tax preparation.

When you decide that it's time you find a tax expert, we hope you'll choose McRuer CPAs.  No matter the tax problem, we can help you make the best choices efficiently and effectively while helping you put together a long-term plan to make certain you pay no more than the taxes you owe. That will give you peace of mind.

Contact us online by clicking here or all us at 816.741.7882.

02/21/2015

How to Know When You Need a CPA

The DIY (Do It Yourself) industry is flourishing these days.  This trend also extends to accounting and income tax services.  The availability of affordable computing power, improved entry-level accounting and income tax software, and cloud-based applications and storage options are attractive because they may help you save money by doing it yourself.  Added to that is some very effective advertising claiming that at the push of a button your business accounting and income tax filings will be worry free.  However, be warned; our clients often turn to us when their experience with DIY solutions show the ease and efficiency of using these products has been oversold.

In today’s highly regulated environment, innocent omissions and mistakes from simply not knowing An-accountant-helping-clientshow transactions should be recorded, or how to properly comply with new federal, state or local tax
law, can be costly, and sometimes devastating.  Instead of spending time increasing sales, improving processes and growing their businesses, some business owners say they grow frustrated and waste time trying to learn to use and update the latest software as well as keep up with filing deadlines and regulations by themselves.  That’s when they call us.

Let’s consider how engaging professional help with your business accounting and finances can pay big benefits that will help your bottom line both short-term and long-term. 

For those business owners who have a solid accounting or bookkeeping background and a good understanding of business finances, with McRuer CPAs’ MyMcRuer/BackOffice service offering you may benefit by a combination of some DIY and some professional on-demand services.

MyMcRuer/BackOffice helps business owners control costs by personally managing their business’s books.  In addition, when a difficult issue or a question arises, they have access to a local experienced accounting professional who will view the issue real time to identify the problem and quickly provide a solution.  Then as the business grows and its operations need more of an owner's or manager’s time, a smooth transition can be made to full-time professional accountants and bookkeepers who already know the business.

If you intend to grow your business, the benefits of professional accounting services cannot be overestimated.  Is it time that you utilized a professional for your combined personal and business tax preparation?  When is it cost effective to hire an accounting firm’s experts to help with your business accounting and bookkeeping needs?

Consider the following as a mental checklist to help you find an answer to the question: 

How Do I Know When I Need a Professional Accountant or CPA?

You know you need a professional accountant or CPA when…

(circle the sentence numbers that apply to you and when finished add up the total number of sentences that describe your financial situation)

  1. You are considering investing significant time, money and passion into a business idea. Before you “take the leap” you want input about your business plan from an independent professional who will review the numbers and help you analyze your idea’s future growth potential.
  2. You are starting a new business and want to select the best business structure that fits the marketplace, your proficiency and your goals.  You have been told there are different types of business entities that may limit your personal liability for your business activities, but you don’t understand the tax consequences of this decision.
  3. Your income and deductions have changed and you no longer file a simple tax return, or you suspect you must make quarterly estimated tax payments.
  4. You need new or additional business financing, and your lender or insuror is requesting financial information that must be provided by a third party.
  5. You want to better understand your business’s financial information, and use it to improve profitability, inventory management, and cash flow.
  6. You need more information in order to prepare to sell your business.
  7. You are shutting down your business.
  8. You hire other people to help you, and you need information about employees versus independent contractors.
  9. You have become responsible for another person’s affairs, either during their life or after their passing.
  10. The IRS or another regulatory agency has contacted you about an upcoming audit or other collection actions.
  11. You wish to develop and act on a plan to provide for your financial future, including saving for retirement, your childrens’ education, and/or other obligations.
  12. You want to ensure you have the best estate plan in place by understanding the tax, financial and time-based consequences of that plan.
  13. You want to create a succession plan for passing your business on to the next person when you’re ready to retire or sell.
  14. You want to take responsibility for your business and personal financial affairs, and want a trusted advisor to help you succeed.
  15. You must prepare and file Forms W2 and 1099 annually.
  16. You need to understand your best choices on property purchase versus equipment leasing.

How many of the above statements apply to you?

These are just a few of the practical reasons that you need a professional accountant on your business’ financial team.  If you circled 3 to 5 of the above business and personal accounting points, it’s probably time you considered using an upgraded business accounting tool that provides a live accountant when you need one.  If you circled more than 5, it’s time you connect with a professional accountant long-term with comprehensive services and experience to ensure business success.

Accountant over shoulderConsider using a CPA (Certified Professional Accountant) that is experienced and trained specifically to be your business and personal financial planner, management consultant, management information specialist, business consultant and more. 

Yet, don’t forget to consider whether the professional you bring on board is someone you get along with personally.  Financial decisions are a reflection of the production and goals of real people like you who are working to make profits in order to enjoy the life you love.  It’s important to find an accountant who will work well with your business team and shares your concerns about accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and long-term effectiveness.

When you know you need an accountant, we’re here.

At McRuer CPAs, we know business “numbers” are personal and we make the extra effort to match the personalities of our professional accountants with you and your business team.  You may discover the latest online tools with the on-demand help of a CPA are the best choice for you and your business.  Maybe it's time to have a full-time accounting professional join your team?  How do you what to do?

Let’s find out what will work best for you.  Contact us for a strategic planning session by calling 816.741.7882 or contact us through our confidential online resource.  We’ll review your goals and help you make the best choice.

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