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Business Tax Preparation

12/19/2017

How Tax Overhaul Would Change Business Taxes

Although the exact details are not yet confirmed, we expect a number of changes in the new tax reform bill will affect both large and small businesses.   The Journal of Accountancy, a leading resource on legislative matters affecting accounting regulations, has issued the following summary of the tax bill's expected reforms. As a service to you, we are providing this summary in its entirety for your review.

How Tax Overhaul Would Change Business Taxes

The tax reform bill that Congress is expected to vote on this week contains numerous changes that will affect businesses large and small. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, H.R. 1, would make sweeping modifications to the Internal Revenue Code, including a much lower corporate tax rate, changes to credits and deductions, and a move to a territorial system for corporations that have overseas earnings.

Here are many of the bill’s business provisions.

Corporate tax rate

The bill would replace the current graduated corporate tax rate, which taxes income over $10 million at 35%, with a flat rate of 21%. The House version of H.R. 1 had provided for a special 25% rate on personal service corporations, but that special rate does not appear in the final bill. The new rate would take effect Jan. 1, 2018.

Corporate AMT

The bill would repeal the corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT).

Depreciation

Bonus depreciation: The bill would extend and modify bonus depreciation under Sec. 168(k), allowing businesses to immediately deduct 100% of the cost of eligible property in the year it is placed in service, through 2022. The amount of allowable bonus depreciation would then be phased down over four years: 80% would be allowed for property placed in service in 2023, 60% in 2024, 40% in 2025, and 20% in 2026. (For certain property with long production periods, the above dates would be pushed out a year.)

The bill would also remove the requirement that bonus depreciation is only available for new property.

Luxury automobile depreciation limits: The bill would increase the depreciation limits under Sec. 280F that apply to listed property. For passenger automobiles placed in service after 2017 and for which bonus depreciation is not claimed, the maximum amount of allowable depreciation is $10,000 for the year in which the vehicle is placed in service, $16,000 for the second year, $9,600 for the third year, and $5,760 for the fourth and later years.

Sec. 179 expensing: The bill would increase the maximum amount a taxpayer may expense under Sec. 179 to $1 million and increase the phaseout threshold to $2.5 million. These amounts would be indexed for inflation after 2018.

The bill would also expand the definition of Sec. 179 property to include certain depreciable tangible personal property used predominantly to furnish lodging or in connection with furnishing lodging. It would also expand the definition of qualified real property eligible for Sec. 179 expensing to include any of the following improvements to nonresidential real property: roofs; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning property; fire protection and alarm systems; and security systems.

Accounting methods

Cash method of accounting: The bill would expand the list of taxpayers that are eligible to use the cash method of accounting by allowing taxpayers that have average annual gross receipts of $25 million or less in the three prior tax years to use the cash method. The $25 million gross-receipts threshold would be indexed for inflation after 2018. Under the provision, the cash method of accounting may be used by taxpayers, other than tax shelters, that satisfy the gross-receipts test, regardless of whether the purchase, production, or sale of merchandise is an income-producing factor.

Farming C corporations (or farming partnerships with a C corporation partner) would be allowed to use the cash method if they meet the $25 million gross-receipts test.

The current-law exceptions from the use of the accrual method would otherwise remain the same, so qualified personal service corporations, partnerships without C corporation partners, S corporations, and other passthrough entities would continue to be allowed to use the cash method without regard to whether they meet the $25 million gross-receipts test, so long as the use of such method clearly reflects income.

Inventories: Taxpayers that meet the cash method $25 million gross-receipts test would also not be required to account for inventories under Sec. 471. Instead, they would be allowed to use an accounting method that either treats inventories as nonincidental materials and supplies or conforms to their financial accounting treatment of inventories.

UNICAP: Taxpayers that meet the cash-method $25 million gross-receipts test would be exempted from the uniform capitalization rules of Sec. 263A. (Current-law exemptions from the UNICAP rules that are not based on gross receipts are retained in the law.)

Expenses and deductions

Interest deduction limitation: Under the bill, the deduction for business interest would be limited to the sum of (1) business interest income; (2) 30% of the taxpayer’s adjusted taxable income for the tax year; and (3) the taxpayer’s floor plan financing interest for the tax year. Any disallowed business interest deduction could be carried forward indefinitely (with certain restrictions for partnerships).

Any taxpayer that meets the $25 million gross-receipts test would be exempt from the interest deduction limitation. The limitation would also not apply to any real property development, redevelopment, construction, reconstruction, acquisition, conversion, rental, operation, management, leasing, or brokerage trade or business. Farming businesses would be allowed to elect out of the limitation.

For these purposes, business interest means any interest paid or accrued on indebtedness properly allocable to a trade or business. Business interest income means the amount of interest includible in the taxpayer’s gross income for the tax year that is properly allocable to a trade or business. However, business interest does not include investment interest, and business interest income does not include investment income, within the meaning of Sec. 163(d).

Floor plan financing interest means interest paid or accrued on indebtedness used to finance the acquisition of motor vehicles held for sale or lease to retail customers and secured by the inventory so acquired.

Net operating losses: The bill would limit the deduction for net operating losses (NOLs) to 80% of taxable income (determined without regard to the deduction) for losses. (Property and casualty insurance companies are exempt from this limitation.)

Taxpayers would be allowed to carry NOLs forward indefinitely. The two-year carryback and special NOL carryback provisions would be repealed. However, farming businesses would still be allowed a two-year NOL carryback.

Like-kind exchanges: Under the bill, like-kind exchanges under Sec. 1031 would be limited to exchanges of real property that is not primarily held for sale. This provision generally applies to exchanges completed after Dec. 31, 2017. However, an exception is provided for any exchange if the property disposed of by the taxpayer in the exchange is disposed of on or before Dec. 31, 2017, or the property received by the taxpayer in the exchange is received on or before that date.

Domestic production activities: The bill would repeal the Sec. 199 domestic production activities deduction.

Entertainment expenses: The bill would disallow a deduction with respect to (1) an activity generally considered to be entertainment, amusement, or recreation; (2) membership dues with respect to any club organized for business, pleasure, recreation, or other social purposes; or (3) a facility or portion thereof used in connection with any of the above items.

Qualified transportation fringe benefits: The bill would disallow a deduction for expenses associated with providing any qualified transportation fringe to employees of the taxpayer, and except as necessary for ensuring the safety of an employee, any expense incurred for providing transportation (or any payment or reimbursement) for commuting between the employee’s residence and place of employment.

Meals: Under the bill taxpayers would still generally be able to deduct 50% of the food and beverage expenses associated with operating their trade or business (e.g., meals consumed by employees on work travel). For amounts incurred and paid after Dec. 31, 2017, and until Dec. 31, 2025, the bill would expand this 50% limitation to expenses of the employer associated with providing food and beverages to employees through an eating facility that meets requirements for de minimis fringes and for the convenience of the employer. Such amounts incurred and paid after Dec. 31, 2025, would not be deductible.

Partnership technical terminations: The bill would repeal the Sec. 708(b)(1)(B) rule providing for technical terminations of partnerships under specified circumstances. The provision does not change the current-law rule of Sec. 708(b)(1)(A) that a partnership is considered as terminated if no part of any business, financial operation, or venture of the partnership continues to be carried on by any of its partners in a partnership.

Carried interests: The bill would provide for a three-year holding period in the case of certain net long-term capital gain with respect to any applicable partnership interest held by the taxpayer. It would treat as short-term capital gain taxed at ordinary income rates the amount of a taxpayer’s net long-term capital gain with respect to an applicable partnership interest if the partnership interest has been held for less than three years.

The conference report clarifies that the three-year holding requirement applies notwithstanding the rules of Sec. 83 or any election in effect under Sec. 83(b).

Amortization of research and experimental expenditures: Under the bill, amounts defined as specified research or experimental expenditures must be capitalized and amortized ratably over a five-year period. Specified research or experimental expenditures that are attributable to research that is conducted outside of the United States must be capitalized and amortized ratably over a 15-year period.

Year of inclusion: The bill would require accrual-method taxpayers subject to the all-events test to recognize items of gross income for tax purposes in the year in which they recognize the income on their applicable financial statement (or another financial statement under rules to be specified by the IRS). The bill would provide an exception for taxpayers without an applicable or other specified financial statement.

Credits

The bill would modify a number of credits available to businesses. The House version of the bill would have repealed a large number of business credits, but the final bill generally does not repeal those credits. Changes to business credits in the final bill include:

Orphan drug credit: The amount of the Sec. 45C credit for clinical testing expenses for drugs for rare diseases or conditions would be reduced to 25% (from the current 50%).

Rehabilitation credit: The bill would modify the Sec. 47 rehabilitation credit to repeal the 10% credit for pre-1936 buildings and retain the 20% credit for certified historic structures. However, the credit would be claimed over a five-year period.

Employer credit for paid family or medical leave: The bill would allow eligible employers to claim a credit equal to 12.5% of the amount of wages paid to a qualifying employee during any period in which the employee is on family and medical leave if the rate of payment under the program is 50% of the wages normally paid to the employee. The credit is increased by 0.25 percentage points (but not above 25%) for each percentage point by which the rate of payment exceeds 50%. The maximum amount of family and medical leave that may be taken into account with respect to any employee for any tax year is 12 weeks. However, the credit would only be available in 2018 and 2019.

Compensation

Covered employees: Sec. 162(m) limits the deductibility of compensation paid to certain covered employees of publicly traded corporations. Current law defines a covered employee as the chief executive officer and the four most highly compensated officers (other than the CEO). The bill would revise the definition of a covered employee under Sec. 162(m) to include both the principal executive officer and the principal financial officer and would reduce the number of other officers included to the three most highly compensated officers for the tax year. The bill would also require that if an individual is a covered employee for any tax year (after 2016), that individual will remain a covered employee for all future years. The bill would also remove current exceptions for commissions and performance-based compensation.

The bill includes a transition rule so that the proposed changes would not apply to any remuneration under a written binding contract that was in effect on Nov. 2, 2017, and that was not later modified in any material respect.

Qualified equity grants: The bill would allow a qualified employee to elect to defer, for income tax purposes, the inclusion in income of the amount of income attributable to qualified stock transferred to the employee by the employer. An election to defer income inclusion with respect to qualified stock must be made no later than 30 days after the first time the employee’s right to the stock is substantially vested or is transferable, whichever occurs earlier.

Taxation of foreign income

The bill would provide a 100% deduction for the foreign-source portion of dividends received from “specified 10% owned foreign corporations” by domestic corporations that are U.S. shareholders of those foreign corporations within the meaning of Sec. 951(b). The conference report says that the term “dividend received” is intended to be interpreted broadly, consistently with the meaning of the phrases “amount received as dividends” and “dividends received” under Secs. 243 and 245, respectively.

A specified 10%-owned foreign corporation is any foreign corporation (other than a passive foreign investment company (PFIC) that is not also a controlled foreign corporation (CFC)) with respect to which any domestic corporation is a U.S. shareholder.

The deduction is not available for any dividend received by a U.S. shareholder from a CFC if the dividend is a hybrid dividend. A hybrid dividend is an amount received from a CFC for which a deduction would be allowed under this provision and for which the specified 10%-owned foreign corporation received a deduction (or other tax benefit) from any income, war profits, and excess profits taxes imposed by a foreign country.

Foreign tax credit: No foreign tax credit or deduction would be allowed for any taxes paid or accrued with respect to a dividend that qualifies for the deduction.

Holding period: A domestic corporation would not be permitted a deduction in respect of any dividend on any share of stock that is held by the domestic corporation for 365 days or less during the 731-day period beginning on the date that is 365 days before the date on which the share becomes ex-dividend with respect to the dividend.

Deemed repatriation: The bill generally requires that, for the last tax year beginning before Jan. 1, 2018, any U.S. shareholder of a specified foreign corporation must include in income its pro rata share of the accumulated post-1986 deferred foreign income of the corporation. For purposes of this provision, a specified foreign corporation is any foreign corporation in which a U.S. person owns a 10% voting interest. It excludes PFICs that are not also CFCs.

A portion of that pro rata share of foreign earnings is deductible; the amount of the deductible portion depends on whether the deferred earnings are held in cash or other assets. The deduction results in a reduced rate of tax with respect to income from the required inclusion of preeffective date earnings. The reduced rate of tax is 15.5% for cash and cash equivalents and 8% for all other earnings. A corresponding portion of the credit for foreign taxes is disallowed, thus limiting the credit to the taxable portion of the included income. The separate foreign tax credit limitation rules of current-law Sec. 904 apply, with coordinating rules. The increased tax liability generally may be paid over an eight-year period. Special rules are provided for S corporations and real estate investment trusts (REITs).

Foreign intangible income: The bill would provide domestic C corporations (that are not regulated investment companies or REITs) with a reduced tax rate on “foreign-derived intangible income” (FDII) and “global intangible low-taxed income” (GILTI). FDII is the portion of a domestic corporation’s intangible income that is derived from serving foreign markets, using a formula in a new Sec. 250. GILTI would be defined in a new Sec. 951A.

The effective tax rate on FDII would be 13.125% in tax years beginning after 2017 and before 2026 and 16.406% after 2025. The effective tax rate on GILTI would be 10.5% in tax years beginning after 2017 and before 2026 and 13.125% after 2025.

Definition of U.S. shareholder: The bill would amend the ownership attribution rules of Sec. 958(b) to expand the definition of “U.S. shareholder” to include a U.S. person who owns at least 10% of the value of the shares of the foreign corporation.

Alistair M. Nevius (Alistair.Nevius@aicpa-cima.com) is the Journal of Accountancy’s editor-in-chief, tax.

If you have questions about how the tax law changes will affect your business and what your next steps should be, please contact us online or call 816.741.7882 to set up an appointment to discuss details with one of our tax planning experts at McRuer CPAs. 

11/16/2017

McRuer CPAs 2017 Year-End Tax Guide

The 2017 calendar year is wrapping up quickly. While many of us have our eyes on the holiday season, this is the time to review your personal and business financial goals. Think of it as a  “checkup” to make certain you make the most effective, tax-savvy financial moves to end this year fiscally healthy.

"Timely financial planning is one of the best gifts you can give yourself as it will affect you and/or your business for years to come."

Even with significant tax reform expected for the 2018 tax season, we are still working under the federal and state tax laws that are on the books for 2017 taxes. We have compiled a quick tax tip guide to review some of the financial topics that we have determined to be the most important and relevant tax issues for most taxpayers for year-end review.

Click now to download the 2017 McRuer CPAs Year-End Tax Tips Guide.

Each individual and business is unique, so consider discussing your options with a professional in time to make any tax-saving moves that may help your particular needs. Please contact us if you have any questions or would like to schedule a year-end tax planning session with a McRuer CPAs Tax Planning Team Member.  If you are already a McRuer CPAs client, the year-end planning session is free.  Call us at: 816.741.7882.

05/01/2017

Trump Tax Reform Goals: Press Release and Articles

Trump at microphonePresident Donald Trump has released a single-page summary of the goals and priorities of his tax reform package.  We have a copy of the document to share with you as well as links to various articles on the subject available online for your review. While specifics of an actual proposal are not yet available, we hope the information and various media reviews will help clarify the intended direction of a tax reform proposal from the perspective of the White House. Please contact one of our tax planning experts if you have questions as to how the proposed tax reforms may affect your individual and/or business tax planning strategies.

Click on the information lines below to download articles and postings:

Actual Media Release from the White House

White House Press Briefing on Proposed Tax Reform Goals

Various Media Articles With Responses and Opinions   (Postings of these links to articles should not infer that McRuer CPAs is in agreement with any or all of the following media responses. The list is simply a way to provide you more information from various views.)

Journal of Accountancy from the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA.org)

FOX Business News

Wall Street Journal

New York Times

Bloomberg Review

The National Review

CNN Money

Kansas City Star

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jefferson City News Tribune

04/13/2017

Taxes on Tips

While tips are discretionary and reflect a happy customer, taxes on tips are not optional and, if overlooked, can cause unhappy headaches for both taxpayers and their employers.

Tip jar picAll cash and non-cash tips are considered income and are subject to Federal income taxes. Tips include cash left by a customer, tips added to debit or credit card charges, and tips received from other employees or employer through tip sharing, tip pooling or other arrangements.

Employees who receive tips regularly are responsible for keeping a daily tip record and reporting all tips on their individual income tax return.  They must report tips that total $20 or more in any month by the 10th of the following month regardless of total wages and tips for the year.

If an employee doesn’t have or isn’t assigned a tip-tracking and reporting tool, the IRS provides a Daily Record of Tips (Form 4070) that an employee may use to document tips in the manner which is considered sufficient proof of tips received. Reliable proof of tip income would include copies of restaurant bills and credit card charges that show the amounts customers added as tips.

Automatic service charges that are often added onto bills are not considered tips, but rather are treated as regular wages so any taxes owed would be withheld by an employer on an employee’s next paycheck. Examples of service charges include things like bottle service charges, gratuity that is automatically added to a bill for large parties, delivery charges, and room service charges.

Employers must withhold income, social security and Medicare taxes on tips just as they would on other income earned by their employee.  If tips are not reported to an employer as required, an employee may face a penalty of 50% of the unpaid social security and Medicare taxes due.

If there are any unreported tips, a taxpayer must file a report of the income through another Form 4137 "Social Security and Medicare Tax on Unreported Tip Income" which helps the employee figure the amount that is subject to tax and how much is owed.

It can be a tedious process especially for workers who make money through a predetermined hourly wage with unpredictable tip income added to the total.  Workers who receive their tips at the end of each shift must make certain they record the tip amounts on their monthly tip report to their employers.  The taxes owed would then be deducted from their next paycheck. It’s possible that hourly wages may not cover the taxes owed. When this happens, any remaining taxes owed can paid out of the next paycheck through an employer agreement. This is the area where most problems occur as tax obligations on tips for one month may impact several paychecks.  It’s up to the employee to keep track of required tax payments so that there are no outstanding payroll taxes owed at year’s end.

If you need more help understanding how to record and report tip income, please contact one of our tax preparation experts at McRuer CPAs.

04/10/2017

Deducting Work-Related Expenses

Work expensesTaxpayers who work for an employer and who pay for work-related expenses out of their own pocket may be able to deduct them on their income tax returns.  Qualified employee business expenses are deductible if when combined with other miscellaneous deductions, the total spent is more than two percent of a taxpayer’s adjusted gross income.

Some examples of qualified deductible employee business expenses may include:

  • the cost of purchasing required uniforms or work clothes not worn away from the work environment,
  • business use of a home,
  • business use of a personal vehicle,
  • business-related meals and entertainment,
  • work-related travel away from home, and
  • tools and supplies purchased for use on the job.

Other deductible expenses that employed taxpayers often overlook are costs of things like the depreciation of their own computer they use for work-related purposes, union dues, malpractice or business liability insurance premiums and subscriptions to professional journals and trade magazines related to work.

Taxpayers must to itemize the deductions and maintain records of income along with receipts of expenses.  If expenses have been reimbursed by an employer, they are not tax deductible.

The expenses must also be ordinary and necessary for their work.  An employee who purchases an item featuring their company’s logo may not deduct the expense unless the employer requires them to wear or use the item while performing their job.  For example, flight attendants who must buy their own uniforms to wear while serving passengers on an aircraft may deduct the expense of the uniform, but not the cost of personal earrings worn to complement their uniform.

K-12 teachers may be able to deduct up to $250 of certain out-of-pocket expenses.  Deductible expenses for 2016 federal income taxes may include the cost of books, classroom supplies, equipment and other materials teachers use to help instruct students.  For example, a physical education teacher may deduct up to $250 of athletic supplies purchased for students that were needed and used by the student(s) to complete or perform physical education course requirements. This particular work-related deduction is calculated as an adjustment to income rather than an itemized deduction, so they need not itemize to claim this deduction.

IRS Publication 529 “Miscellaneous Deductions” and Publication 463 “Travel, Entertainment, Gift and Car Expenses” provide more specific details about deducting employee business expenses.

If you need more information on deducting work-related expenses, contact one of our experts on tax preparation at McRuer CPAs.

03/15/2017

Going Digital With Direct Deposits

More than ever before, taxpayers are choosing digital tools to file their tax returns and receive refunds. The latest numbers show 4 out of 5 taxpayers filed electronically in 2016 using a professional tax preparer or online software.  Of those taxpayers who qualified for a refund, 8 out of 10 chose to have the money deposited directly into a bank account rather than waiting for a check to arrive by mail.

Picture1The growth in digital tax tools use is due in part to IRS mandates.  Paper returns require more man hours to process; costing more and lengthening the time to receive a tax refund by weeks or months.  The IRS now requires most tax preparation professionals to file all tax returns and attachments electronically.  While under no mandate, more do-it-yourself taxpayers with simple tax returns are choosing to use the internet to prepare their returns using the IRS Free File software, and send electronically prepared returns through IRS e-File.  This trend reflects security and privacy concerns as well as worries about delays that can come from paper filings and paper checks.

Combining IRS e-File with the direct deposit program is the fastest way to receive a refund and the transaction is free.  Most refunds are issued within 21 calendar days once the IRS receives a tax return.  A taxpayer may request that their refund be split into deposits in up to three separate financial accounts.  There are also options to purchase savings bonds, have a portion of a refund deposited into an Individual Retirement Account or make a deposit into an account with a pre-paid debit card.  A refund should only be deposited into an account or accounts that are in the taxpayer’s own name or spouse’s name, if it’s a joint account.

Tax agency officials try to reassure taxpayers the system used to receive tax records and payments as well as send refunds is the safest system available.  In the fall of 2015 and again in January 2016, new IRS software updates crashed the system and a small part of its online payment collection system was hacked causing delays and the need to reset taxpayer pins for security.  

Today, the IRS uses the same electronic transfer system for refunds that is used to deliver almost all Social Security and Veterans Affairs benefits to millions of accounts.  It combines built-in security protection tools with layers of online protection programs provided by banks and financial institutions.

You can request the electronic direct deposit option to receive your refund even if you file a paper return by mail; yet know that processing a paper return takes the IRS on average two months longer than processing a digital return.  Requesting a direct deposit of your refund will not speed up the processing time.

If you have questions about the direct deposit option for income tax refunds, please contact one of our tax preparation specialists at McRuer CPAs for more information.

02/15/2017

Going Digital With Direct Deposits


Internet-sales-tax copyMore than ever before, taxpayers are choosing digital tools to file their tax returns and receive refunds. The latest numbers show 4 out of 5 taxpayers filed electronically in 2016 using a professional tax preparer or online software.  Of those taxpayers who qualified for a refund, 8 out of 10 chose to have the money deposited directly into a bank account rather than waiting for a check to arrive by mail.

The growth in digital tax tools use is due in part to IRS mandates.  Paper returns require more man hours to process; costing more and lengthening the time to receive a tax refund by weeks or months.  The IRS now requires most tax preparation professionals to file all tax returns and attachments electronically.  While under no mandate, more do-it-yourself taxpayers with simple tax returns are choosing to use the internet to prepare their returns using the IRS Free File software, and send electronically prepared returns through IRS e-File. This trend reflects security and privacy concerns as well as worries about delays that can come from paper filings and paper checks.

Combining IRS e-File with the direct deposit program is the fastest way to receive a refund and the transaction is free.  Most refunds are issued within 21 calendar days once the IRS receives a tax return.  A taxpayer may request that their refund be split into deposits in up to three separate financial accounts.  There are also options to purchase savings bonds, have a portion of a refund deposited into an Individual Retirement Account or make a deposit into an account with a pre-paid debit card.  A refund should only be deposited into an account or accounts that are in the taxpayer’s own name or spouse’s name, if it’s a joint account.

Tax agency officials try to reassure taxpayers the system used to receive tax records and payments as well as send refunds is the safest system available.  In the fall of 2015 and again in January 2016, new IRS software updates crashed the system and a small part of its online payment collection system was hacked causing delays and the need to reset taxpayer pins for security.

Today, the IRS uses the same electronic transfer system for refunds that is used to deliver almost all Social Security and Veterans Affairs benefits to millions of accounts.  It combines built-in security protection tools with layers of online protection programs provided by banks and financial institutions.

You can request the electronic direct deposit option to receive your refund even if you file a paper return by mail; yet know that processing a paper return takes the IRS on average two months longer than processing a digital return.  Requesting a direct deposit of your refund will not speed up the processing time.

If you have questions about the direct deposit option for income tax refunds, please contact one of our tax preparation specialists at McRuer CPAs for more information.

02/10/2017

W-2 Scam Targets Small Business

Question-yikA5pBiEThe IRS has issued a new tax-related identity-theft scam warning to small businesses and human resources professionals.  The email phishing scam uses a business owner’s, corporate officer’s or human resource professional’s name in what looks like company or even official tax agency emails. The emails request copies of employee Forms W-2 from company payroll, internal accounting or human resources departments.

This is the second time the email scam has been identified as attacking businesses nationwide. The IRS urges business owners, internal accountants and company payroll officials to double check any executive-level requests for lists of Forms W-2 or Social Security Numbers.

The W-2 scam first appeared in early 2016. The IRS reports that cybercriminals tricked payroll and human resource officials into disclosing employee names, SSNs and income information. The thieves then attempted to file fraudulent tax returns to create fraudulent income tax refunds in a tax-related identity theft scheme.

This phishing variation is known as a “spoofing” e-mail.  It will contain, for example, the actual company chief executive officer’s name.  In this variation, the “CEO” sends an email to a company payroll office or human resource employee requesting a list of employees and information including their SSNs.

Crime investigators say some of the wording used in actual scam emails included:

  • “Kindly send me the individual 2016 Forms W-2 (PDF) and earnings summaries of our company staff for a quick review.”
  • “Can you send me the updated list of employees with full details (Name, Social Security Number, Date of Birth, Home Address, Salary).”
  • “I want you to send me the list of Form W-2 copies of employees’ wage and tax statement for 2016.  I need them in PDF file type, and please send it as an attachment.  Kindly prepare the lists and email them to me asap.”

Working together in the Security Summit, the IRS, states and tax industry representatives have made progress fighting against tax-related identity theft.  However, cybercriminals continue developing more sophisticated tactics to impersonate taxpayers in their effort to steal even more data.

For more information about tax-related identity theft and other tax scams, click here to link to The Security Summit’s national taxpayer awareness campaign called “Taxes. Security. Together.

01/09/2017

2017 Mileage Rates for Business Use of a Vehicle

As reported by the Journal of Accountancy: The IRS has announced  the optional standard mileage rates for business use of a vehicle will drop slightly in 2017, the second consecutive annual decline. For business use of a car, van, pickup truck, or panel truck, the rate for 2017 will be 53.5 cents per mile, down from 54 cents per mile in 2016. Taxpayers can use the optional standard mileage rates to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile.

Driving for medical or moving purposes may be deducted at 17 cents per mile, which is two cents lower than for 2016. The rate for service to a charitable organization is unchanged, set by statute at 14 cents per mile (Sec. 170(i)).

The portion of the business standard mileage rate that is treated as depreciation will be 25 cents per mile for 2017, one cent higher than for 2016.

To compute the allowance under a fixed and variable rate (FAVR) plan, the maximum standard automobile cost is $27,900 for 2017 (down from $28,000 for 2016) for automobiles (not including trucks and vans) and $31,300 for trucks and vans (an increase of $300 from 2016). Under a FAVR plan, a standard amount is deemed substantiated for an employer’s reimbursement to employees for expenses they incur in driving their vehicle in performing services as an employee for the employer.

See more at: http://www.journalofaccountancy.com/news/2016/dec/irs-2017-mileage-rates-201615701.html#sthash.sxZ6OHvw.dpuf

01/06/2017

2017 Tax Rates (If Nothing Changes)

Income tax graphicPending any immediate changes under a new administration, tax officials say low inflation rates will ensure that current tax brackets and most other tax system features will change only slightly in 2017 with the exception of effects of health coverage mandates.

The standard deduction will rise $50 for individuals to $6,350 from $6,300.  The personal exemption increased $4,050 in 2016 and will remain the same in 2017. The standard deduction for married filing jointly rises $100 to $12,700.

The personal exemption for tax year 2017 remains at $4,050.  However, the exemption is subject to a phase-out that begins with adjusted gross incomes of $261,500 ($313,800 for married couples filing jointly). It phases out completely at $384,000 ($436,300 for married couples filing jointly).

But for those taxpayers who do not maintain the minimum essential health coverage in 2017, the penalty which is collected by the IRS will increase significantly. The charge for failing to have qualified health insurance coverage will be $695 or 2.5% of income for individuals and $2,085 or 2.5% of income for families.  The penalty was $325 for individuals and $975 for families in 2015. That was an increase from the penalty of $95 for individuals or $285 for families in 2014.

The 2017 top individual tax rate of 39.6% will apply to income above $470,000 for married couples, up
from $466,950.  The Affordable Care Act (ACA) or ‘Obamacare’ mandates that high-income taxpayers pay another 3.8% surtax on net investment income, so the top federal income tax rate for individuals is actually 43.4% and will remain at that level pending a possible ACA repeal.

Qualified dividends and long-term capital gains are also taxed an additional 15% or 20% depending upon income and are subject to another 3.8% net investment income tax.

Estates of decedents who die during 2017 have a basic exclusion amount of $5,490,000, up from a total of $5,450,000 for estates of decedents who died in 2016.

These rates are set to apply to 2017 taxes which will be filed in early 2018.

Call us at McRuer CPAs if you have any questions: 816.741.7882 or contact us online by clicking here.

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