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What the Tax Reform Bill Means For Individuals

Although the exact details are not yet confirmed, we expect a number of changes in the new tax reform bill will affect individuals of all incomes.   The Journal of Accountancy, a leading resource on legislative matters affecting accounting regulations, has issued the following summary of the tax bill's expected reforms.  As a service to you, we are providing this summary in its entirety for your review.  Please contact us to set up a tax planning session to review strategies that you may now need to include in your individual tax plan.

What the Tax Reform Bill Means For Individuals

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, H.R. 1, agreed to by a congressional conference committee on Friday and expected to be voted on by both houses of Congress during the week of Dec. 18, contains a large number of provisions that would affect individual taxpayers. However, to keep the cost of the bill within Senate budget rules, all of the changes affecting individuals would expire after 2025. At that time, if no future Congress acts to extend H.R. 1’s provision, the individual tax provisions would sunset, and the tax law would revert to its current state.

Here is a look at many of the provisions in the bill affecting individuals.

Tax rates

For tax years 2018 through 2025, the following rates would apply to individual taxpayers:

Single taxpayers

Taxable income over

But not over

Is taxed at






















Heads of households

Taxable income over

But not over

Is taxed at






















Married taxpayers filing joint returns and surviving spouses

Taxable income over

But not over

Is taxed at






















Married taxpayers filing separately

Taxable income over

But not over

Is taxed at






















Estates and trusts

Taxable income over

But not over

Is taxed at













Special brackets would apply for certain children with unearned income.

Standard deduction: The bill would increase the standard deduction through 2025 for individual taxpayers to $24,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly, $18,000 for heads of households, and $12,000 for all other individuals. The additional standard deduction for elderly and blind taxpayers is not changed by the bill.

Personal exemptions: The bill would repeal all personal exemptions through 2025. The withholding rules will be modified to reflect the fact that individuals can no longer claim personal exemptions.

Passthrough income deduction

For tax years after 2017 and before 2026, individuals would be allowed to deduct 20% of “qualified business income” from a partnership, S corporation, or sole proprietorships, as well as 20% of qualified real estate investment trust (REIT) dividends, qualified cooperative dividends, and qualified publicly traded partnership income. (Special rules would apply to specified agricultural or horticultural cooperatives.)

A limitation on the deduction would be phased in based on W-2 wages above a threshold amount of taxable income. The deduction would also be disallowed for specified service trades or businesses with income above a threshold.

For these purposes, “qualified business income” would mean the net amount of qualified items of income, gain, deduction, and loss with respect to the qualified trade or business of the taxpayer. These items must be effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the United States. They do not include specified investment-related income, deductions, or losses.

“Qualified business income” would not include an S corporation shareholder’s reasonable compensation, guaranteed payments, or—to the extent provided in regulations—payments to a partner who is acting in a capacity other than his or her capacity as a partner.

“Specified service trades or businesses” include any trade or business in the fields of accounting, health, law, consulting, athletics, financial services, brokerage services, or any business where the principal asset of the business is the reputation or skill of one or more of its employees.

The exclusion from the definition of a qualified business for specified service trades or businesses phases in for a taxpayer with taxable income in excess of $157,500 or $315,000 in the case of a joint return.

For each qualified trade or business, the taxpayer is allowed to deduct 20% of the qualified business income with respect to such trade or business. Generally, the deduction is limited to 50% of the W-2 wages paid with respect to the business. Alternatively, capital-intensive businesses may yield a higher benefit under a rule that takes into consideration 25% of wages paid plus a portion of the business’s basis in its tangible assets. However, if the taxpayer’s income is below the threshold amount, the deductible amount for each qualified trade or business is equal to 20% of the qualified business income with respect to each respective trade or business.

Child tax credit

The bill would increase the amount of the child tax credit to $2,000 per qualifying child. The maximum refundable amount of the credit would be $1,400. The bill would also create a new nonrefundable $500 credit for qualifying dependents who are not qualifying children. The threshold at which the credit begins to phase out would be increased to $400,000 for married taxpayers filing a joint return and $200,000 for other taxpayers.

Other credits

The House version of the bill would have repealed several credits that are retained in the final version of the bill. These include:

  • The Sec. 22 credit for the elderly and permanently disabled;
  • The Sec. 30D credit for plug-in electric drive motor vehicles; and
  • The Sec. 25 credit for interest on certain home mortgages.

The House bill’s proposed modifications to the American opportunity tax credit and lifetime learning credit also did not make it into the final bill.

Education provisions

The bill would modify Sec. 529 plans to allow them to distribute no more than $10,000 in expenses for tuition incurred during the tax year at an elementary or secondary school. This limitation applies on a per-student basis, rather than a per-account basis. Certain homeschool expenses would also qualify as eligible expenses for purposes of the Sec. 529 rules.

The bill would modify the exclusion of student loan discharges from gross income, by including within the exclusion certain discharges on account of death or disability.

The House bill’s provisions repealing the student loan interest deduction and the deduction for qualified tuition and related expenses were not retained in the final bill.

The House bill’s proposed repeal of the exclusion for interest on Series EE savings bond used for qualified higher education expenses and repeal of the exclusion for educational assistance programs also do not appear in the final bill.

Itemized deductions

The bill would repeal the overall limitation on itemized deductions, through 2025.

Mortgage interest: The home mortgage interest deduction would be modified to reduce the limit on acquisition indebtedness to $750,000 (from the current-law $1 million).

A taxpayer who has entered into a binding written contract before Dec. 15, 2017, to close on the purchase of a principal residence before Jan. 1, 2018, and who purchases that residence before April 1, 2018, will be considered to have incurred acquisition indebtedness prior to Dec. 15, 2017, under this provision, meaning that they will be allowed the current-law $1 million limit.

Home equity loans. The home equity loan interest deduction would be repealed through 2025.

State and local taxes: Under the final bill, individuals would be allowed to deduct up to $10,000 ($5,000 for married taxpayers filing separately) in state and local income or property taxes.

The conference report on the bill specifies that taxpayers cannot take a deduction in 2017 for prepaid 2018 state income taxes.

Casualty losses: Under the bill, taxpayers can only take a deduction for casualty losses if the loss is attributable to a presidentially declared disaster.

Gambling losses: The bill would clarify that the term “losses from wagering transactions” in Sec. 165(d) includes any otherwise allowable deduction incurred in carrying on a wagering transaction. This is intended, according to the conference report, to clarify that the limitation of losses from wagering transactions applies not only to the actual costs of wagers, but also to other expenses incurred by the taxpayer in connection with his or her gambling activity.

Charitable contributions: The bill would increase the income-based percentage limit for charitable contributions of cash to public charities to 60%. It would also deny a charitable deduction for payments made for college athletic event seating rights. Finally, it would repeal the statutory provision that provides an exception to the contemporaneous written acknowledgment requirement for certain contributions that are reported on the donee organization’s return—a current-law provision that has never been put in effect because regulations have not been issued.

Miscellaneous itemized deductions: All miscellaneous itemized deductions subject to the 2% floor under current law would be repealed through 2025 by the bill.

Medical expenses: The bill would reduce the threshold for deduction of medical expenses to 7.5% of adjusted gross income for 2017 and 2018.

Other provisions

Alimony: For any divorce or separation agreement executed after Dec. 31, 2018, the bill would provide that alimony and separate maintenance payments are not deductible by the payor spouse. It would also repeal the provisions that provide that such payments are includible in income by the payee spouse.

Moving expenses: The moving expense deduction would be repealed through 2025, except for members of the armed forces on active duty who move pursuant to a military order and incident to a permanent change of station.

Archer MSAs: The House bill would have eliminated the deduction for contributions to Archer MSAs; the final bill does not include this provision.

Educator’s classroom expenses: The final bill does not change the current-law allowance of an above-the-line $250 deduction for educators’ expenses incurred for professional development or to purchase classroom materials.

Exclusion for bicycle commuting reimbursements: The bill would repeal through 2025 the exclusion from gross income or wages of qualified bicycle commuting expenses.

Sale of a principal residence: The bill would not change the current rules regarding exclusion of gain from the sale of a principal residence.

Moving expense reimbursements: The bill would repeal through 2025 the exclusion from gross income and wages for qualified moving expense reimbursements, except in the case of a member of the armed forces on active duty who moves pursuant to a military order.

IRA recharacterizations

The bill would exclude conversion contributions to Roth IRAs from the rule that allows IRA contributions to one type of IRA to be recharacterized as a contribution to the other type of IRA. This would prevent taxpayers from using recharacterization to unwind a Roth conversion.

Estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer taxes

The bill would double the estate and gift tax exemption for estates of decedents dying and gifts made after Dec. 31, 2017, and before Jan. 1, 2026. The basic exclusion amount provided in Sec. 2010(c)(3) would increase from $5 million to $10 million and would be indexed for inflation occurring after 2011.

Alternative minimum tax

While the House version of the bill would have repealed the alternative minimum tax (AMT) for individuals, the final bill keeps the tax, but increases the exemption.

For tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017, and beginning before Jan. 1, 2026, the AMT exemption amount would increase to $109,400 for married taxpayers filing a joint return (half this amount for married taxpayers filing a separate return) and $70,300 for all other taxpayers (other than estates and trusts). The phaseout thresholds would be increased to $1 million for married taxpayers filing a joint return and $500,000 for all other taxpayers (other than estates and trusts). The exemption and threshold amounts would indexed for inflation.

Individual mandate

The bill would reduce to zero the amount of the penalty under Sec. 5000A, imposed on taxpayers who do not obtain insurance that provides at least minimum essential coverage, effective after 2018.

Alistair M. Nevius (Alistair.Nevius@aicpa-cima.com) is the JofA’s editor-in-chief, tax.

If you have questions about how the tax law changes will affect your business and what your next steps should be, please contact us online or call 816.741.7882 to set up an appointment to discuss details with one of our tax planning experts at McRuer CPAs.

How Tax Overhaul Would Change Business Taxes

Although the exact details are not yet confirmed, we expect a number of changes in the new tax reform bill will affect both large and small businesses.   The Journal of Accountancy, a leading resource on legislative matters affecting accounting regulations, has issued the following summary of the tax bill's expected reforms. As a service to you, we are providing this summary in its entirety for your review.

How Tax Overhaul Would Change Business Taxes

The tax reform bill that Congress is expected to vote on this week contains numerous changes that will affect businesses large and small. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, H.R. 1, would make sweeping modifications to the Internal Revenue Code, including a much lower corporate tax rate, changes to credits and deductions, and a move to a territorial system for corporations that have overseas earnings.

Here are many of the bill’s business provisions.

Corporate tax rate

The bill would replace the current graduated corporate tax rate, which taxes income over $10 million at 35%, with a flat rate of 21%. The House version of H.R. 1 had provided for a special 25% rate on personal service corporations, but that special rate does not appear in the final bill. The new rate would take effect Jan. 1, 2018.

Corporate AMT

The bill would repeal the corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT).


Bonus depreciation: The bill would extend and modify bonus depreciation under Sec. 168(k), allowing businesses to immediately deduct 100% of the cost of eligible property in the year it is placed in service, through 2022. The amount of allowable bonus depreciation would then be phased down over four years: 80% would be allowed for property placed in service in 2023, 60% in 2024, 40% in 2025, and 20% in 2026. (For certain property with long production periods, the above dates would be pushed out a year.)

The bill would also remove the requirement that bonus depreciation is only available for new property.

Luxury automobile depreciation limits: The bill would increase the depreciation limits under Sec. 280F that apply to listed property. For passenger automobiles placed in service after 2017 and for which bonus depreciation is not claimed, the maximum amount of allowable depreciation is $10,000 for the year in which the vehicle is placed in service, $16,000 for the second year, $9,600 for the third year, and $5,760 for the fourth and later years.

Sec. 179 expensing: The bill would increase the maximum amount a taxpayer may expense under Sec. 179 to $1 million and increase the phaseout threshold to $2.5 million. These amounts would be indexed for inflation after 2018.

The bill would also expand the definition of Sec. 179 property to include certain depreciable tangible personal property used predominantly to furnish lodging or in connection with furnishing lodging. It would also expand the definition of qualified real property eligible for Sec. 179 expensing to include any of the following improvements to nonresidential real property: roofs; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning property; fire protection and alarm systems; and security systems.

Accounting methods

Cash method of accounting: The bill would expand the list of taxpayers that are eligible to use the cash method of accounting by allowing taxpayers that have average annual gross receipts of $25 million or less in the three prior tax years to use the cash method. The $25 million gross-receipts threshold would be indexed for inflation after 2018. Under the provision, the cash method of accounting may be used by taxpayers, other than tax shelters, that satisfy the gross-receipts test, regardless of whether the purchase, production, or sale of merchandise is an income-producing factor.

Farming C corporations (or farming partnerships with a C corporation partner) would be allowed to use the cash method if they meet the $25 million gross-receipts test.

The current-law exceptions from the use of the accrual method would otherwise remain the same, so qualified personal service corporations, partnerships without C corporation partners, S corporations, and other passthrough entities would continue to be allowed to use the cash method without regard to whether they meet the $25 million gross-receipts test, so long as the use of such method clearly reflects income.

Inventories: Taxpayers that meet the cash method $25 million gross-receipts test would also not be required to account for inventories under Sec. 471. Instead, they would be allowed to use an accounting method that either treats inventories as nonincidental materials and supplies or conforms to their financial accounting treatment of inventories.

UNICAP: Taxpayers that meet the cash-method $25 million gross-receipts test would be exempted from the uniform capitalization rules of Sec. 263A. (Current-law exemptions from the UNICAP rules that are not based on gross receipts are retained in the law.)

Expenses and deductions

Interest deduction limitation: Under the bill, the deduction for business interest would be limited to the sum of (1) business interest income; (2) 30% of the taxpayer’s adjusted taxable income for the tax year; and (3) the taxpayer’s floor plan financing interest for the tax year. Any disallowed business interest deduction could be carried forward indefinitely (with certain restrictions for partnerships).

Any taxpayer that meets the $25 million gross-receipts test would be exempt from the interest deduction limitation. The limitation would also not apply to any real property development, redevelopment, construction, reconstruction, acquisition, conversion, rental, operation, management, leasing, or brokerage trade or business. Farming businesses would be allowed to elect out of the limitation.

For these purposes, business interest means any interest paid or accrued on indebtedness properly allocable to a trade or business. Business interest income means the amount of interest includible in the taxpayer’s gross income for the tax year that is properly allocable to a trade or business. However, business interest does not include investment interest, and business interest income does not include investment income, within the meaning of Sec. 163(d).

Floor plan financing interest means interest paid or accrued on indebtedness used to finance the acquisition of motor vehicles held for sale or lease to retail customers and secured by the inventory so acquired.

Net operating losses: The bill would limit the deduction for net operating losses (NOLs) to 80% of taxable income (determined without regard to the deduction) for losses. (Property and casualty insurance companies are exempt from this limitation.)

Taxpayers would be allowed to carry NOLs forward indefinitely. The two-year carryback and special NOL carryback provisions would be repealed. However, farming businesses would still be allowed a two-year NOL carryback.

Like-kind exchanges: Under the bill, like-kind exchanges under Sec. 1031 would be limited to exchanges of real property that is not primarily held for sale. This provision generally applies to exchanges completed after Dec. 31, 2017. However, an exception is provided for any exchange if the property disposed of by the taxpayer in the exchange is disposed of on or before Dec. 31, 2017, or the property received by the taxpayer in the exchange is received on or before that date.

Domestic production activities: The bill would repeal the Sec. 199 domestic production activities deduction.

Entertainment expenses: The bill would disallow a deduction with respect to (1) an activity generally considered to be entertainment, amusement, or recreation; (2) membership dues with respect to any club organized for business, pleasure, recreation, or other social purposes; or (3) a facility or portion thereof used in connection with any of the above items.

Qualified transportation fringe benefits: The bill would disallow a deduction for expenses associated with providing any qualified transportation fringe to employees of the taxpayer, and except as necessary for ensuring the safety of an employee, any expense incurred for providing transportation (or any payment or reimbursement) for commuting between the employee’s residence and place of employment.

Meals: Under the bill taxpayers would still generally be able to deduct 50% of the food and beverage expenses associated with operating their trade or business (e.g., meals consumed by employees on work travel). For amounts incurred and paid after Dec. 31, 2017, and until Dec. 31, 2025, the bill would expand this 50% limitation to expenses of the employer associated with providing food and beverages to employees through an eating facility that meets requirements for de minimis fringes and for the convenience of the employer. Such amounts incurred and paid after Dec. 31, 2025, would not be deductible.

Partnership technical terminations: The bill would repeal the Sec. 708(b)(1)(B) rule providing for technical terminations of partnerships under specified circumstances. The provision does not change the current-law rule of Sec. 708(b)(1)(A) that a partnership is considered as terminated if no part of any business, financial operation, or venture of the partnership continues to be carried on by any of its partners in a partnership.

Carried interests: The bill would provide for a three-year holding period in the case of certain net long-term capital gain with respect to any applicable partnership interest held by the taxpayer. It would treat as short-term capital gain taxed at ordinary income rates the amount of a taxpayer’s net long-term capital gain with respect to an applicable partnership interest if the partnership interest has been held for less than three years.

The conference report clarifies that the three-year holding requirement applies notwithstanding the rules of Sec. 83 or any election in effect under Sec. 83(b).

Amortization of research and experimental expenditures: Under the bill, amounts defined as specified research or experimental expenditures must be capitalized and amortized ratably over a five-year period. Specified research or experimental expenditures that are attributable to research that is conducted outside of the United States must be capitalized and amortized ratably over a 15-year period.

Year of inclusion: The bill would require accrual-method taxpayers subject to the all-events test to recognize items of gross income for tax purposes in the year in which they recognize the income on their applicable financial statement (or another financial statement under rules to be specified by the IRS). The bill would provide an exception for taxpayers without an applicable or other specified financial statement.


The bill would modify a number of credits available to businesses. The House version of the bill would have repealed a large number of business credits, but the final bill generally does not repeal those credits. Changes to business credits in the final bill include:

Orphan drug credit: The amount of the Sec. 45C credit for clinical testing expenses for drugs for rare diseases or conditions would be reduced to 25% (from the current 50%).

Rehabilitation credit: The bill would modify the Sec. 47 rehabilitation credit to repeal the 10% credit for pre-1936 buildings and retain the 20% credit for certified historic structures. However, the credit would be claimed over a five-year period.

Employer credit for paid family or medical leave: The bill would allow eligible employers to claim a credit equal to 12.5% of the amount of wages paid to a qualifying employee during any period in which the employee is on family and medical leave if the rate of payment under the program is 50% of the wages normally paid to the employee. The credit is increased by 0.25 percentage points (but not above 25%) for each percentage point by which the rate of payment exceeds 50%. The maximum amount of family and medical leave that may be taken into account with respect to any employee for any tax year is 12 weeks. However, the credit would only be available in 2018 and 2019.


Covered employees: Sec. 162(m) limits the deductibility of compensation paid to certain covered employees of publicly traded corporations. Current law defines a covered employee as the chief executive officer and the four most highly compensated officers (other than the CEO). The bill would revise the definition of a covered employee under Sec. 162(m) to include both the principal executive officer and the principal financial officer and would reduce the number of other officers included to the three most highly compensated officers for the tax year. The bill would also require that if an individual is a covered employee for any tax year (after 2016), that individual will remain a covered employee for all future years. The bill would also remove current exceptions for commissions and performance-based compensation.

The bill includes a transition rule so that the proposed changes would not apply to any remuneration under a written binding contract that was in effect on Nov. 2, 2017, and that was not later modified in any material respect.

Qualified equity grants: The bill would allow a qualified employee to elect to defer, for income tax purposes, the inclusion in income of the amount of income attributable to qualified stock transferred to the employee by the employer. An election to defer income inclusion with respect to qualified stock must be made no later than 30 days after the first time the employee’s right to the stock is substantially vested or is transferable, whichever occurs earlier.

Taxation of foreign income

The bill would provide a 100% deduction for the foreign-source portion of dividends received from “specified 10% owned foreign corporations” by domestic corporations that are U.S. shareholders of those foreign corporations within the meaning of Sec. 951(b). The conference report says that the term “dividend received” is intended to be interpreted broadly, consistently with the meaning of the phrases “amount received as dividends” and “dividends received” under Secs. 243 and 245, respectively.

A specified 10%-owned foreign corporation is any foreign corporation (other than a passive foreign investment company (PFIC) that is not also a controlled foreign corporation (CFC)) with respect to which any domestic corporation is a U.S. shareholder.

The deduction is not available for any dividend received by a U.S. shareholder from a CFC if the dividend is a hybrid dividend. A hybrid dividend is an amount received from a CFC for which a deduction would be allowed under this provision and for which the specified 10%-owned foreign corporation received a deduction (or other tax benefit) from any income, war profits, and excess profits taxes imposed by a foreign country.

Foreign tax credit: No foreign tax credit or deduction would be allowed for any taxes paid or accrued with respect to a dividend that qualifies for the deduction.

Holding period: A domestic corporation would not be permitted a deduction in respect of any dividend on any share of stock that is held by the domestic corporation for 365 days or less during the 731-day period beginning on the date that is 365 days before the date on which the share becomes ex-dividend with respect to the dividend.

Deemed repatriation: The bill generally requires that, for the last tax year beginning before Jan. 1, 2018, any U.S. shareholder of a specified foreign corporation must include in income its pro rata share of the accumulated post-1986 deferred foreign income of the corporation. For purposes of this provision, a specified foreign corporation is any foreign corporation in which a U.S. person owns a 10% voting interest. It excludes PFICs that are not also CFCs.

A portion of that pro rata share of foreign earnings is deductible; the amount of the deductible portion depends on whether the deferred earnings are held in cash or other assets. The deduction results in a reduced rate of tax with respect to income from the required inclusion of preeffective date earnings. The reduced rate of tax is 15.5% for cash and cash equivalents and 8% for all other earnings. A corresponding portion of the credit for foreign taxes is disallowed, thus limiting the credit to the taxable portion of the included income. The separate foreign tax credit limitation rules of current-law Sec. 904 apply, with coordinating rules. The increased tax liability generally may be paid over an eight-year period. Special rules are provided for S corporations and real estate investment trusts (REITs).

Foreign intangible income: The bill would provide domestic C corporations (that are not regulated investment companies or REITs) with a reduced tax rate on “foreign-derived intangible income” (FDII) and “global intangible low-taxed income” (GILTI). FDII is the portion of a domestic corporation’s intangible income that is derived from serving foreign markets, using a formula in a new Sec. 250. GILTI would be defined in a new Sec. 951A.

The effective tax rate on FDII would be 13.125% in tax years beginning after 2017 and before 2026 and 16.406% after 2025. The effective tax rate on GILTI would be 10.5% in tax years beginning after 2017 and before 2026 and 13.125% after 2025.

Definition of U.S. shareholder: The bill would amend the ownership attribution rules of Sec. 958(b) to expand the definition of “U.S. shareholder” to include a U.S. person who owns at least 10% of the value of the shares of the foreign corporation.

Alistair M. Nevius (Alistair.Nevius@aicpa-cima.com) is the Journal of Accountancy’s editor-in-chief, tax.

If you have questions about how the tax law changes will affect your business and what your next steps should be, please contact us online or call 816.741.7882 to set up an appointment to discuss details with one of our tax planning experts at McRuer CPAs. 


4 New Tax Tips in Light of Tax Reform

Tax reform in blueAs we wait to see the details included in the new tax reform bill, we have additional new tips for individuals and businesses to consider before the 2017 tax year wraps up.

Click here to read:  4 New Tax Tips in Light of Tax Reform

You may also be interested in another blog posting regarding more information affecting your overall tax planning strategy.

Click here to read:  The 2017 McRuer CPAs Year-End Tax Tips Guide

Please contact us online or call us at 816.741.7882 to set up a meeting to review your tax plan in light of tax reform and the wrap up of the 2017 tax year.


McRuer CPAs 2017 Year-End Tax Guide

The 2017 calendar year is wrapping up quickly. While many of us have our eyes on the holiday season, this is the time to review your personal and business financial goals. Think of it as a  “checkup” to make certain you make the most effective, tax-savvy financial moves to end this year fiscally healthy.

"Timely financial planning is one of the best gifts you can give yourself as it will affect you and/or your business for years to come."

Even with significant tax reform expected for the 2018 tax season, we are still working under the federal and state tax laws that are on the books for 2017 taxes. We have compiled a quick tax tip guide to review some of the financial topics that we have determined to be the most important and relevant tax issues for most taxpayers for year-end review.

Click now to download the 2017 McRuer CPAs Year-End Tax Tips Guide.

Each individual and business is unique, so consider discussing your options with a professional in time to make any tax-saving moves that may help your particular needs. Please contact us if you have any questions or would like to schedule a year-end tax planning session with a McRuer CPAs Tax Planning Team Member.  If you are already a McRuer CPAs client, the year-end planning session is free.  Call us at: 816.741.7882.


Details of House Tax Reform Bill

As you may know the House Ways and Means Committee has released the Tax Cut and Jobs Act (H.R. 1) providing some new tax reform provisions while incorporating many of the details included in the Republican-backed tax reform package submitted in September. There are a number of tax issues that may affect you, should they be approved following the budget debate process in Washington. Those details include changes, updates and protections for various business and individual tax rates, deductions and retirement plan contributions.

Tax-Reform with flagThe Journal of Accountancy has published an article with a review of the provisions of the new tax proposal draft (as submitted before debate and possible amendments) that offers a review of many of the details that we hope will be informative and helpful to you as you begin thinking of year-end tax planning.

 Note: his article has been published by the Journal of Accountancy, a professional’s resource for information regarding accounting and taxation issues.  It is the primary publication, as edited and released by the Association of International Certified Professional Accountants. It is one of many resources we use at McRuer CPAs to keep us informed about issues that affect the businesses and individuals we serve.  This particular news information article regards the consideration of a legislative proposal. Such initial legislation is subjected to debate and amendments. Therefore, this first review of the tax reform legislation draft is to be considered as a preliminary summary and first look at the new tax reform proposal and may not be the actual legislation approved by lawmakers over time.

For a look at the actual bill itself, noting that the language will likely be edited in several ways before passing, click here.

Details of Tax Reform Legislation Revealed

By Sally Schreiber, J.D.; Paul Bonner; and Alistair Nevius, J.D.

The House Ways and Means Committee released draft tax reform legislation on Thursday. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, H.R. 1, incorporates many of the provisions listed in the Republicans’ September tax reform framework while providing new details. Budget legislation passed in October would allow for the tax reform bill to cut federal government revenue by up to $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years and still be enacted under the Senate’s budget reconciliation rules, which would require only 51 votes in the Senate for passage. The Joint Committee on Taxation issued an estimate of the revenue effects of the bill on Thursday showing a net total revenue loss of $1.487 trillion over 10 years.

The bill features new tax rates, a lower limit on the deductibility of home mortgage interest, the repeal of most deductions for individuals, and full expensing of depreciable assets by businesses, among its many provisions.

Lawmakers had reportedly been discussing lowering the contribution limits for Sec. 401(k) plans, but the bill does not include any changes to those limits.

The Senate Finance Committee is reportedly working on its own version of tax reform legislation, which is expected to be unveiled next week. It is unclear how much that bill will differ from the House bill released on Thursday.


Tax rates: The bill would impose four tax rates on individuals: 12%, 25%, 35%, and 39.6%, effective for tax years after 2017. The current rates are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35%, and 39.6%. The 25% bracket would start at $45,000 of taxable income for single taxpayers and at $90,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly.

The 35% bracket would start at $200,000 of taxable income for single taxpayers and at $260,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly. And the 39.6% bracket would apply to taxable income over $500,000 for single taxpayers and $1 million for joint filers.

Standard deduction and personal exemption: The standard deduction would increase from $6,350 to $12,200 for single taxpayers and from $12,700 to $24,400 for married couples filing jointly, effective for tax years after 2017. Single filers with at least one qualifying child would get an $18,300 standard deduction. These amounts will be adjusted for inflation after 2019. However, the personal exemption would be eliminated.

Deductions: Most deductions would be repealed, including the medical expense deduction, the alimony deduction, and the casualty loss deduction (except for personal casualty losses associated with special disaster relief legislation). The deduction for tax preparation fees would also be eliminated.

However, the deductions for charitable contributions and for mortgage interest would be retained. The mortgage interest deduction on existing mortgages would remain the same; for newly purchased residences (that is, for debt incurred after Nov. 2, 2017), the limit on deductibility would be reduced to $500,000 of acquisition indebtedness from the current $1.1 million. The overall limitation of itemized deductions would also be repealed.

Some rules for charitable contributions would change for tax years beginning after 2017. Among those changes, the current 50% limitation would be increased to 60%.

The deduction for state and local income or sales taxes would be eliminated, except that income or sales taxes paid in carrying out a trade or business or producing income would still be deductible. State and local real property taxes would continue to be deductible, but only up to $10,000. These provisions would be effective for tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017.

Credits: Various credits would also be repealed by the bill, including the adoption tax credit, the credit for the elderly and the totally and permanently disabled, the credit associated with mortgage credit certificates, and the credit for plug-in electric vehicles.

The child tax credit would be increased from $1,000 to $1,600, and a $300 credit would be allowed for nonchild dependents. A new “family flexibility” credit of $300 would be allowed for other dependents. The $300 credit for nonchild dependents and the family flexibility credit would expire after 2022.

The American opportunity tax credit, the Hope scholarship credit, and the lifetime learning credit would be combined into one credit, providing a 100% tax credit on the first $2,000 of eligible higher education expenses and a 25% credit on the next $2,000, effective for tax years after 2017. Contributions to Coverdell education savings accounts (except rollover contributions) would be prohibited after 2017, but taxpayers would be allowed to roll over money in their Coverdell ESAs into a Sec. 529 plan.

The bill would also repeal the deduction for interest on education loans and the deduction for qualified tuition and related expenses, as well as the exclusion for interest on U.S. savings bonds used to pay qualified higher education expenses, the exclusion for qualified tuition reduction programs, and the exclusion for employer-provided education assistance programs.

Other taxes: The bill would repeal the alternative minimum tax (AMT).

The estate tax would be repealed after 2023 (with the step-up in basis for inherited property retained). In the meantime, the estate tax exclusion amount would double (currently it is $5,490,000, indexed for inflation). The top gift tax rate would be lowered to 35%.

Passthrough income: A portion of net income distributions from passthrough entities would be taxed at a maximum rate of 25%, instead of at ordinary individual income tax rates, effective for tax years after 2017. The bill includes provisions to prevent individuals from converting wage income into passthrough distributions. Passive activity income would always be eligible for the 25% rate.

For income from nonpassive business activities (including wages), owners and shareholders generally could elect to treat 30% of the income as eligible for the 25% rate; the other 70% would be taxed at ordinary income rates. Alternatively, owners and shareholders could apply a facts-and-circumstances formula.

However, for specified service activities, the applicable percentage that would be eligible for the 25% rate would be zero. These activities are those defined in Sec. 1202(e)(3)(A) (any trade or business involving the performance of services in the fields of health, law, engineering, architecture, accounting, actuarial science, performing arts, consulting, athletics, financial services, brokerage services, or any trade or business where the principal asset of such trade or business is the reputation or skill of one or more of its employees), including investing, trading, or dealing in securities, partnership interests, or commodities.

Business provisions

A flat corporate rate: The bill would replace the current four-tier schedule of corporate rates (15%, 25%, 34%, and 35%, with a $75,001 threshold for the 34% rate) with a flat 20% rate (25% for personal services corporations). The corporate AMT is repealed along with the individual AMT.

Higher expensing levels: The bill would provide 100% expensing of qualified property acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017, and before Jan. 1, 2023 (with an additional year for longer-production-period property). It would also increase tenfold the Sec. 179 expensing limitation ceiling and phaseout threshold to $5 million and $20 million, respectively, both indexed for inflation.

Cash accounting method more widely available: The bill would increase to $25 million the current $5 million average gross receipts ceiling for corporations generally permitted to use the cash method of accounting and extend it to businesses with inventories. Such businesses also would be exempted from the uniform capitalization (UNICAP) rules. The exemption from the percentage-of-completion method for long-term contracts of $10 million in average gross receipts would also be increased to $25 million.

NOLs, other deductions eliminated or limited: Deductions of net operating losses (NOLs) would be limited to 90% of taxable income. NOLs would have an indefinite carryforward period, but carrybacks would no longer be available for most businesses. Carryforwards for losses arising after 2017 would be increased by an interest factor. Other deductions also would be curtailed or eliminated:

  • Instead of the current provisions under Sec. 163(j) limiting a deduction for business interest paid to a related party or basing a limitation on the taxpayer’s debt-equity ratio or a percentage of adjusted taxable income, the bill would impose a limit of 30% of adjusted taxable income for all businesses with more than $25 million in average gross receipts.
  • The Sec. 199 domestic production activities deduction would be repealed.
  • Deductions for entertainment, amusement, or recreation activities as a business expense would be generally eliminated, as would employee fringe benefits for transportation and certain other perks deemed personal in nature rather than directly related to a trade or business, except to the extent that such benefits are treated as taxable compensation to an employee (or includible in gross income of a recipient who is not an employee).

Like-kind exchanges limited to real estate: The bill would limit like-kind exchange treatment to real estate, but a transition rule would allow completion of currently pending Sec. 1031 exchanges of personal property.

Business and energy credits curtailed: Offsetting some of the revenue loss resulting from the lower top corporate tax rate, the bill would repeal a number of business credits, including:

  • The work opportunity tax credit (Sec. 51).
  • The credit for employer-provided child care (Sec. 45F).
  • The credit for rehabilitation of qualified buildings or certified historic structures (Sec. 47).
  • The Sec. 45D new markets tax credit. Credits allocated before 2018 could still be used in up to seven subsequent years.
  • The credit for providing access to disabled individuals (Sec. 44).
  • The credit for enhanced oil recovery (Sec. 43).
  • The credit for producing oil and gas from marginal wells (Sec. 45I)

Other credits would be modified, including those for a portion of employer Social Security taxes paid with respect to employee tips (Sec. 45B), for electricity produced from certain renewable resources (Sec. 45), for production from advanced nuclear power facilities (Sec. 45J), and the investment tax credit (Sec. 46) for eligible energy property. The Sec. 25D residential energy-efficient property credit, which expired for property placed in service after 2016, would be extended retroactively through 2022 but reduced beginning in 2020.

Bond provisions: Several types of tax-exempt bonds would become taxable:

  • Private activity bonds would no longer be tax-exempt. The bill would include in taxpayer income interest on such bonds issued after 2017.
  • Interest on bonds issued to finance construction of, or capital expenditures for, a professional sports stadium would be taxable.
  • Interest on advance refunding bonds would be taxable.
  • Current provisions relating to tax credit bonds would generally be repealed. Holders and issuers would continue receiving tax credits and payments for tax credit bonds already issued, but no new bonds could be issued.

Insurance provisions: The bill would introduce several revenue-raising provisions modifying special rules applicable to the insurance industry. These include bringing life insurers’ NOL carryover rules into conformity with those of other businesses.

Compensation provisions: The bill would impose new limits on the deductibility of certain highly paid employees’ pay, including, for the first time, those of tax-exempt organizations.

  • Nonqualified deferred compensation would be subject to tax in the tax year in which it is no longer subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture. Current law would apply to existing nonqualified deferred compensation arrangements until the last tax year beginning before 2026.
  • The exceptions for commissions and performance-based compensation from the Sec. 162(m) $1 million limitation on deductibility of compensation of certain top employees of publicly traded corporations would be repealed. The bill would also include more employees in the definition of “covered employee” subject to the limit.
  • The bill would impose similar rules on executives of organizations exempt from tax under Sec. 501(a), with a 20% excise tax on compensation exceeding $1 million paid to any of a tax-exempt organization’s five highest-paid employees, including “excess parachute payments.”

Foreign income and persons

Deduction for foreign-source dividends received by 10% U.S. corporate owners: The bill would add a new section to the Code, Sec. 245A, which replaces the foreign tax credit for dividends received by a U.S. corporation with a dividend-exemption system. This provision would be effective for distributions made after 2017. This provision is designed to eliminate the “lock-out” effect that encourages U.S. companies not to bring earnings back to the United States.

The bill would also repeal Sec. 902, the indirect foreign tax credit provision, and amend Sec. 960 to coordinate with the bill’s dividends-received provision. Thus, no foreign tax credit or deduction would be allowed for any taxes (including withholding taxes) paid or accrued with respect to any dividend to which the dividend exemption of the bill would apply.

Elimination of U.S. tax on reinvestments in U.S. property: Under current law, a foreign subsidiary’s undistributed earnings that are reinvested in U.S. property are subject to current U.S. tax. The bill would amend Sec. 956(a) to eliminate this tax on reinvestments in the United States for tax years of foreign corporations beginning after Dec. 31, 2017. This provision would remove the disincentive from reinvesting foreign earnings in the United States.

Limitation on loss deductions for 10%-owned foreign corporations: In a companion provision to the deduction for foreign-source dividends, the bill would amend Sec. 961 and add new Sec. 91 to require a U.S. parent to reduce the basis of its stock in a foreign subsidiary by the amount of any exempt dividends received by the U.S. parent from its foreign subsidiary, but only for determining loss, not gain. The provision also requires a U.S. corporation that transfers substantially all of the assets of a foreign branch to a foreign subsidiary to include in the U.S. corporation’s income the amount of any post-2017 losses that were incurred by the branch. The provisions would be effective for distributions or transfers made after 2017.

Repatriation provision: The bill would amend Sec. 956 to provide that U.S. shareholders owning at least 10% of a foreign subsidiary will include in income for the subsidiary’s last tax year beginning before 2018 the shareholder’s pro rata share of the net post-1986 historical earnings and profits (E&P) of the foreign subsidiary to the extent that E&P have not been previously subject to U.S. tax, determined as of Nov. 2, 2017, or Dec. 31, 2017 (whichever is higher). The portion of E&P attributable to cash or cash equivalents would be taxed at a 12% rate; the remainder would be taxed at a 5% rate. U.S. shareholders can elect to pay the tax liability over eight years in equal annual installments of 12.5% of the total tax due.

Income from production activities sourced: The bill would amend Sec. 863(b) to provide that income from the sale of inventory property produced within and sold outside the United States (or vice versa) is allocated solely on the basis of the production activities for the inventory.

Changes to Subpart F rules: The bill would repeal the foreign shipping income and foreign base company oil-related income rules. It would also add an inflation adjustment to the de minimis exception to the foreign base company income rules and make permanent the lookthrough rule, under which passive income one foreign subsidiary receives from a related foreign subsidiary generally is not includible in the taxable income of the U.S. parent, provided that income was not subject to current U.S. tax or effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business.

Under the bill, a U.S. corporation would be treated as constructively owning stock held by its foreign shareholder for purposes of determining CFC status. The bill would also eliminate the requirements that a U.S. parent corporation must control a foreign subsidiary for 30 days before Subpart F inclusions apply.

Base erosion provisions: Under the bill, a U.S. parent of one or more foreign subsidiaries would be subject to current U.S. tax on 50% of the U.S. parent’s foreign high returns—the excess of the U.S. parent’s foreign subsidiaries’ aggregate net income over a routine return (7% plus the federal short-term rate) on the foreign subsidiaries’ aggregate adjusted bases in depreciable tangible property, adjusted downward for interest expense.

The deductible net interest expense of a U.S. corporation that is a member of an international financial reporting group would be limited to the extent the U.S. corporation’s share of the group’s global net interest expense exceeds 110% of the U.S. corporation’s share of the group’s global earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA).

Payments (other than interest) made by a U.S. corporation to a related foreign corporation that are deductible, includible in costs of goods sold, or includible in the basis of a depreciable or amortizable asset would be subject to a 20% excise tax, unless the related foreign corporation elected to treat the payments as income effectively connected with the conduct of a U.S. trade or business. Consequently, the foreign corporation’s net profits (or gross receipts if no election is made) with respect to those payments would be subject to full U.S. tax, eliminating the potential U.S. tax benefit otherwise achieved.

Exempt organizations

Clarification that state and local entities are subject to unrelated business income tax (UBIT): The bill would amend Sec. 511 to clarify that all state and local entities including pension plans are subject to the Sec. 511 tax on unrelated business income (UBI).

Exclusion from UBIT for research income: The act would amend the Code to provide that income from research is exempt from UBI only if the results are freely made available to the public.

Reduction in excise tax paid by private foundations: The bill would repeal the current rules that apply either a 1% or 2% tax on private foundations’ net investment income with a 1.4% rate for tax years beginning after 2017.

Modification of the Johnson Amendment: Effective on the date of enactment, the bill would amend Sec. 501 to permit statements about political campaigns to be made by religious organizations.

Sally P. Schreiber (Sally.Schreiber@aicpa-cima.com) and Paul Bonner (Paul.Bonner@aicpa-cima.com) are JofA senior editors, and Alistair M. Nevius (Alistair.Nevius@aicpa-cima.com) is the JofA’s editor-in-chief, tax.


Trump Tax Reform Goals: Press Release and Articles

Trump at microphonePresident Donald Trump has released a single-page summary of the goals and priorities of his tax reform package.  We have a copy of the document to share with you as well as links to various articles on the subject available online for your review. While specifics of an actual proposal are not yet available, we hope the information and various media reviews will help clarify the intended direction of a tax reform proposal from the perspective of the White House. Please contact one of our tax planning experts if you have questions as to how the proposed tax reforms may affect your individual and/or business tax planning strategies.

Click on the information lines below to download articles and postings:

Actual Media Release from the White House

White House Press Briefing on Proposed Tax Reform Goals

Various Media Articles With Responses and Opinions   (Postings of these links to articles should not infer that McRuer CPAs is in agreement with any or all of the following media responses. The list is simply a way to provide you more information from various views.)

Journal of Accountancy from the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA.org)

FOX Business News

Wall Street Journal

New York Times

Bloomberg Review

The National Review

CNN Money

Kansas City Star

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jefferson City News Tribune


Taxes on Tips

While tips are discretionary and reflect a happy customer, taxes on tips are not optional and, if overlooked, can cause unhappy headaches for both taxpayers and their employers.

Tip jar picAll cash and non-cash tips are considered income and are subject to Federal income taxes. Tips include cash left by a customer, tips added to debit or credit card charges, and tips received from other employees or employer through tip sharing, tip pooling or other arrangements.

Employees who receive tips regularly are responsible for keeping a daily tip record and reporting all tips on their individual income tax return.  They must report tips that total $20 or more in any month by the 10th of the following month regardless of total wages and tips for the year.

If an employee doesn’t have or isn’t assigned a tip-tracking and reporting tool, the IRS provides a Daily Record of Tips (Form 4070) that an employee may use to document tips in the manner which is considered sufficient proof of tips received. Reliable proof of tip income would include copies of restaurant bills and credit card charges that show the amounts customers added as tips.

Automatic service charges that are often added onto bills are not considered tips, but rather are treated as regular wages so any taxes owed would be withheld by an employer on an employee’s next paycheck. Examples of service charges include things like bottle service charges, gratuity that is automatically added to a bill for large parties, delivery charges, and room service charges.

Employers must withhold income, social security and Medicare taxes on tips just as they would on other income earned by their employee.  If tips are not reported to an employer as required, an employee may face a penalty of 50% of the unpaid social security and Medicare taxes due.

If there are any unreported tips, a taxpayer must file a report of the income through another Form 4137 "Social Security and Medicare Tax on Unreported Tip Income" which helps the employee figure the amount that is subject to tax and how much is owed.

It can be a tedious process especially for workers who make money through a predetermined hourly wage with unpredictable tip income added to the total.  Workers who receive their tips at the end of each shift must make certain they record the tip amounts on their monthly tip report to their employers.  The taxes owed would then be deducted from their next paycheck. It’s possible that hourly wages may not cover the taxes owed. When this happens, any remaining taxes owed can paid out of the next paycheck through an employer agreement. This is the area where most problems occur as tax obligations on tips for one month may impact several paychecks.  It’s up to the employee to keep track of required tax payments so that there are no outstanding payroll taxes owed at year’s end.

If you need more help understanding how to record and report tip income, please contact one of our tax preparation experts at McRuer CPAs.


Tax Reform Timeline

Although Republicans appear to have more agreement on the specifics of tax reform than health care reform, experts predict we’ll be hearing more debate in committees and in the media before an actual tax reform bill makes it to the House or Senate floor.  Now many experts predict a tax reform or reduction bill will pass, but it may not happen in 2017.

Capitol-hill-washington-d_cThe White House and Republican lawmakers know they need a more unified front to sustain a push for major tax reform, especially in the wake of continued angst and division over health care reform. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is a key player in drafting and negotiating a tax reform proposal.  He says he is optimistic that a comprehensive plan should win approval by the Congressional recess this August. But President Donald Trump has been less specific. When asked recently whether he could “cut a deal on tax reform this year” by a Financial Times editor, Trump responded he did not want to talk about timing saying, “We will have a massive and very strong tax reform. But I am not going to talk about when.”

Leading House Republicans, including House Speaker Paul Ryan, have proposed tax code changes that include a much-debated border adjustment tax. CEOs of 16 U.S. companies including General Electric and Boeing support the proposal that would reduce corporate income tax from 35% to 20%.  It would also impose a 20% tax on imported goods while removing taxes on exported goods.  Critics claim such a tax structure would cause consumer prices to rise and unfairly burden retail and automotive manufacturing industries that purchase low-cost parts and supplies from overseas.

Trump has also expressed an interest in pushing simplified personal income and corporate tax reform through at the same time and may also include an infrastructure investment package in a comprehensive tax plan. Tackling big issues with a massive all-encompassing bill may provide opportunities to please all parties, but may also result in the same kind of partisan and intraparty fractures suffered by health care reform efforts.  

Democrats are also unlikely to support major income tax cuts at either the corporate or personal level.

Based on their recent disappointment over a failed attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act, Republicans know they need to build and confirm support for significant tax reform.  Many financial experts say that means an agreement may not be reached until late 2017 or early 2018.


Deducting Work-Related Expenses

Work expensesTaxpayers who work for an employer and who pay for work-related expenses out of their own pocket may be able to deduct them on their income tax returns.  Qualified employee business expenses are deductible if when combined with other miscellaneous deductions, the total spent is more than two percent of a taxpayer’s adjusted gross income.

Some examples of qualified deductible employee business expenses may include:

  • the cost of purchasing required uniforms or work clothes not worn away from the work environment,
  • business use of a home,
  • business use of a personal vehicle,
  • business-related meals and entertainment,
  • work-related travel away from home, and
  • tools and supplies purchased for use on the job.

Other deductible expenses that employed taxpayers often overlook are costs of things like the depreciation of their own computer they use for work-related purposes, union dues, malpractice or business liability insurance premiums and subscriptions to professional journals and trade magazines related to work.

Taxpayers must to itemize the deductions and maintain records of income along with receipts of expenses.  If expenses have been reimbursed by an employer, they are not tax deductible.

The expenses must also be ordinary and necessary for their work.  An employee who purchases an item featuring their company’s logo may not deduct the expense unless the employer requires them to wear or use the item while performing their job.  For example, flight attendants who must buy their own uniforms to wear while serving passengers on an aircraft may deduct the expense of the uniform, but not the cost of personal earrings worn to complement their uniform.

K-12 teachers may be able to deduct up to $250 of certain out-of-pocket expenses.  Deductible expenses for 2016 federal income taxes may include the cost of books, classroom supplies, equipment and other materials teachers use to help instruct students.  For example, a physical education teacher may deduct up to $250 of athletic supplies purchased for students that were needed and used by the student(s) to complete or perform physical education course requirements. This particular work-related deduction is calculated as an adjustment to income rather than an itemized deduction, so they need not itemize to claim this deduction.

IRS Publication 529 “Miscellaneous Deductions” and Publication 463 “Travel, Entertainment, Gift and Car Expenses” provide more specific details about deducting employee business expenses.

If you need more information on deducting work-related expenses, contact one of our experts on tax preparation at McRuer CPAs.


Do's and Don'ts of Deducting Charitable Donations

So, you donated six bags of clothes to Goodwill and gave your used washer and dryer to the Salvation Army.  Now you hope to claim the donations as a deduction. There are a few things to know before your tax preparer reports your Gifts to Charity on your federal income tax return.

Please Give Jar picFirst, donations must be made to a qualified charity in order to be deductible.  Gifts to individuals, political organizations or candidates are not deductible.  A qualified charity that is designated as a non-profit organization or a 501(c)(3) must not benefit or have as a focus any private shareholder or individual.  Qualified charities must also be up-to-date on their information reports to the IRS that show that their profits are being used for their tax-exempt purposes. To check the status of a charity the IRS now provides a one-stop online tool called Exempt Organizations Select Check (EO Select Check).

In order to deduct a charitable contribution, you must first itemize deductions on Form 1040, Schedule A - Itemized Deductions.  It is important to have documentation that shows the dollar amount of all claimed qualified donations and the specific organization to which the donation was made.  Noncash contributions should have information or may even need an appraisal that reflects the fair market value of the donation at the time it was given.

If you happened to get something in return for your donation, the value of what you received must be subtracted from the claimed donation amount.  You may only deduct the amount that exceeds the fair market value of the benefit received.  Many taxpayers miss this point.  For example, let’s say you participated in a silent auction fundraiser and you “won” with the highest bid, and the item you received was worth more than the amount you paid for it.  You may only deduct the difference between what you paid for the item and the fair market value of the item.  This includes benefits you received like merchandise, meals, and tickets to events or goods and services.

If you donate property instead of cash, the deductible amount is limited to the donated item’s fair market value or the price a seller would receive if the property sold on the open market.  Many taxpayers struggle with determining the value of things like used clothing and household items.  The IRS requires that the items be in good condition or better, and has an online resource to help taxpayers determine the fair market value of items.  Technically each item, including a pair of socks, is supposed to be identified on a worksheet along with its value in order to calculate the actual value of a donation.  Many taxpayers simply take their chances and submit only a receipt from a recognized charitable organization that lists the date and a general description of what is donated, such as “2 boxes of clothing”.  If a taxpayer is audited, they must provide proof for each donation.  Cars, boats and other types of property donations are subject to additional rules.

Whether you donate cash or goods, if the amount of any specific donation is $250 or more, you must submit a written statement from the charity confirming the details.  That statement must report the same donation amount that you’re claiming, and a description of any property that was given.  It must also state whether any goods or services were received in exchange for the donation.

If you make total noncash charitable contributions that exceed $500 for the year, you’ll need to fill out another form, Form 8283, that requires more details and more proof of value.  The type of records that a taxpayer must keep depends upon the amount and type of donation.

Here are examples of charitable contributions:

  • Money or property given to churches, synagogues and other religious organizations
  • Gifts to nonprofit schools and hospitals
  • Gifts to qualified charities such as The Salvation Army, Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts of America, CARE and Goodwill Industries
  • Donations to War Veterans groups
  • Out-of-pocket expenses when you serve a qualified organization as a volunteer

Here are items that are NOT deductible as charitable contributions:

  • The value of your time or services
  • The value of blood given to a blood bank (yes, it has been tried)
  • Cost of raffle, bingo, or lottery tickets
  • Dues, fees or bills paid to country clubs, lodges or fraternal orders
  • Money or property to groups that lobby for law changes
  • Donations to candidates for public office or political groups

If you have any questions about deducting charitable donations from your federal income tax, please contact one of our tax preparation experts at McRuer CPAs for more information.

Find out more about deducting Medical and Dental Expenses in our blog.

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