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IRA Updates and Rules

03/20/2017

April 1 Deadline For Required IRA Distributions

Taxpayers who reached age 70½ during 2016 have until April 1st to apply for and begin receiving required minimum distributions (RMDs) from an Individual Retirement Account (IRA) and/or workplace retirement plan.

Deadline approaches picThe April 1st deadline applies to owners of traditional IRAs, such as SEP and SIMPLE IRAS, but not Roth IRAs.  It also generally applies to participants in various workplace retirement plans, including 401(k), 403(b) and 457(b) plans.  Some employees who are still working may wait to receive distributions, if their plan allows, until April 1st of the year after they retire.

The April 1st deadline only applies to the required distribution for the first year.  For all subsequent years, the RMD must be made by December 31st of each year.  So, a taxpayer who turned age 70½ in 2016 and has received the first required distribution by April 1, 2017, must still receive the second RMD by December 31, 2017.

The amount of the distribution is calculated using life expectancy tables matched to the year-end IRA account value of the IRA.  Worksheets and life expectancy tables are available in in IRS Publication 590-B “Distributions From Individual Retirement Arrangements”.

It can be costly to miss the deadline for receiving a distribution, as the taxpayer faces a 50 percent tax that would be applied to any required amount not received by the April 1st deadline.

For more information, click here to read through frequently asked questions or contact one of our tax experts at McRuer CPAs.

03/17/2017

Saver's Credit Option Offers Rewards

Hand holding moneyThere’s a little known tax credit for people who have low to moderate income and are putting money aside to save for retirement.  The Saver’s Credit is available to eligible taxpayers to use in conjunction with the tax deduction they may already have qualified for by contributing to an IRA.

If your adjusted gross income is below $30,750 as an individual, $46,125 as a head of household or $61,500 as a married couple in 2016, you might be eligible for tax credit.  It can be worth between 10 and 50 percent of the amount you contribute to an IRA up to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples.  You would receive the tax credit on top of the benefits of a tax-free or tax-deferred retirement fund contribution.

The Saver’s Credit applies to contributions made to a traditional or Roth IRA, a 401(K) plan, a SIMPLE IRA, a SARSEP, your 403(b) plan, 501(c)(18) plan or a governmental 457(b) plan.  Voluntary after-tax employee contributions to a qualified retirement and 403(b) plans may also be eligible for the tax credit.

Find out more by clicking here for detailed information.

Splitting Your Tax Refund

Many taxpayers are choosing to split their tax refunds. Splitting refunds is easy and is done electronically through direct deposit allowing the Department of Treasury to deposit your refund dollars in any proportion you want. You may split funds for deposits in up to three different accounts with U.S. financial institutions.

Splitting wood with axe 1A taxpayer may also choose to have a portion of a refund deposited into an Individual Retirement Account or make a deposit into an account with a pre-paid debit card. A refund should only be deposited into an account or accounts that are in the taxpayer’s own name or spouse’s name, if it’s a joint account.

By splitting your refund, you benefit from the convenience of opting to have some of the money deposited into your checking account for immediate use and some deposited to an interest-bearing savings for future use.  In addition, you receive the safety and speed of direct deposit, allowing access to your refund faster than if you opt to receive a paper check. (See more about the direct deposit option in our blog “Going Digital with Direct Deposits”.)

You also may use part or all of your refund to buy U.S. Series I Savings Bonds for yourself or someone else.  The splitting of refunds is a rapidly growing choice among taxpayers as more digital resources become available and security concerns increase about paper trails and identity theft.

03/16/2017

IRA Moves That Save Tax Dollars

There’s still time to reduce your 2016 tax bill as you take steps to maximize the benefits of saving money for retirement.  There are different strategies that can save money or defer taxes through contributing to IRAs and retirement funds each tax year.  For the 2016 tax year, you have until April 18th to make a move. However, if you do make a qualifying IRA contribution between January 1 and April 18, make certain you specifically instruct your financial institution to apply the deposit to the 2016 tax year.  Otherwise, the deposit may automatically be considered a 2017 deposit.

Taxes and moneyUsing a Tax Refund for Tax Savings  Here’s another tip regarding your tax refund and saving for retirement: consider depositing all or part of your tax refund directly into an IRA.  It saves a step by directly depositing the money, it can speed up the timing of the contribution and ensures the deposit is made as you intend.  With a direct deposit, you can even choose to use your 2016 refund to pay for the amount of your 2016 IRA contribution as long as the tax return can be processed and the refund paid before the April 18th deadline. You would designate on Form 8888 “Allocation of Refund” how much of your refund should be deposited directly into your IRA and that it should be designated as your 2016 contribution.

How Much You Can Save  A working taxpayer can defer paying income tax on a contribution of pre-tax dollars up to $5,500 to a Traditional IRA and may split contributions to more than one IRA.  Income tax won’t be due on the money until it is withdrawn from the account.  Contributions to a Roth IRA are after-tax dollars and do not qualify for a tax deduction, though qualified distributions may be withdrawn tax-free at retirement. Contributions to both Traditional and Roth IRAs are limited depending upon modified adjusted gross income.

The actual amount of the tax deduction on a Traditional IRA depends upon the taxpayer’s income tax rate.  For example, a worker in the 25% tax bracket may save $1,375 in income taxes by making the maximum IRA contribution.  Workers in the 35% tax bracket may save $1,925 for the same contribution amount.

If you are age 50 and above, you may contribute an additional $1,000 to an IRA up to a total tax-deductible contribution of no more than $6,500. For example, the tax deduction can range from $975 for individuals in the 25% income tax bracket to $2,275 for those who are in a 35% tax bracket.

Married couples can double their tax deduction if they make the maximum contribution to an IRA in each spouse’s name.  Even if one of the spouses doesn’t work, a contribution can be made for that spouse subject to the spousal IRA limit. The combined contributions must be no more than $11,000 if both are under age 50, $12,000 if one spouse is 50 or older and $13,000 if both are at least 50 years old.

Who Qualifies For Tax Deduction  A taxpayer must earn income in order to save in an IRA. If a worker has no retirement plan at work, the tax deduction for Traditional IRA contributions is allowed in full regardless of income.  If a person or spouse has a retirement plan at work, the tax deduction and the contributions may be limited.  Amounts for both the allowable deduction and contributions phase out at higher income levels calculated as modified adjusted gross income.

People aged 70 ½ and older may no longer claim a tax deduction for their contributions to Traditional IRAs. Upon reaching that age, the fund’s owner must start taking required minimum distributions (RMDs).  Any deductible contributions and earning withdrawn from a Traditional IRA are taxable. Early withdrawals by a person under the age of 59 ½ may be subject to a 10% penalty.  Contributions made to a Roth IRA can be made after age 70 ½ and the amount in the account can be left there as long as the person lives. Qualified distributions are generally not taxable, but early withdrawals are subject to a 10% penalty.

Click here for a description of the difference between Traditional and Roth IRAs.

03/15/2017

Going Digital With Direct Deposits

More than ever before, taxpayers are choosing digital tools to file their tax returns and receive refunds. The latest numbers show 4 out of 5 taxpayers filed electronically in 2016 using a professional tax preparer or online software.  Of those taxpayers who qualified for a refund, 8 out of 10 chose to have the money deposited directly into a bank account rather than waiting for a check to arrive by mail.

Picture1The growth in digital tax tools use is due in part to IRS mandates.  Paper returns require more man hours to process; costing more and lengthening the time to receive a tax refund by weeks or months.  The IRS now requires most tax preparation professionals to file all tax returns and attachments electronically.  While under no mandate, more do-it-yourself taxpayers with simple tax returns are choosing to use the internet to prepare their returns using the IRS Free File software, and send electronically prepared returns through IRS e-File.  This trend reflects security and privacy concerns as well as worries about delays that can come from paper filings and paper checks.

Combining IRS e-File with the direct deposit program is the fastest way to receive a refund and the transaction is free.  Most refunds are issued within 21 calendar days once the IRS receives a tax return.  A taxpayer may request that their refund be split into deposits in up to three separate financial accounts.  There are also options to purchase savings bonds, have a portion of a refund deposited into an Individual Retirement Account or make a deposit into an account with a pre-paid debit card.  A refund should only be deposited into an account or accounts that are in the taxpayer’s own name or spouse’s name, if it’s a joint account.

Tax agency officials try to reassure taxpayers the system used to receive tax records and payments as well as send refunds is the safest system available.  In the fall of 2015 and again in January 2016, new IRS software updates crashed the system and a small part of its online payment collection system was hacked causing delays and the need to reset taxpayer pins for security.  

Today, the IRS uses the same electronic transfer system for refunds that is used to deliver almost all Social Security and Veterans Affairs benefits to millions of accounts.  It combines built-in security protection tools with layers of online protection programs provided by banks and financial institutions.

You can request the electronic direct deposit option to receive your refund even if you file a paper return by mail; yet know that processing a paper return takes the IRS on average two months longer than processing a digital return.  Requesting a direct deposit of your refund will not speed up the processing time.

If you have questions about the direct deposit option for income tax refunds, please contact one of our tax preparation specialists at McRuer CPAs for more information.

02/14/2017

Saving with myRA

The US Department of Treasury is offering the new myRA retirement savings account for people who have no access to a retirement savings plan at their job or lack other options to save.  It is a simple fund that is easy and free to open.  The idea is that if you give people a bit of help, they will learn the benefits of saving money and begin new habits that will last a lifetime.

MyRA logoA myRA account earns interest at the same rate as investments in the Government Securities Fund (average annual return of 2.94% over the last ten years) which are backed by the US Treasury.  It costs nothing to open the account and there are no fees.  A myRA is operated under Roth IRA Rules, so there is an annual contribution limit of $5,500 ($6,500 for individuals 50 years of age or older).  The fund is limited to a maximum $15,000.

The fund’s owner may withdraw any amount of money at any time tax-free and with no penalty.  The money can also be transferred to a private-sector Roth IRA at any time with no penalty.

Contributions may be made from direct deposits from a person’s paycheck, checking or savings account, and a federal income tax refund by marking the “savings” box on the refund section of a return.

The fund is designed to be a part of what is described as a “larger savings journey” with online tracking tools including a myRA Savings Goal calculator.  For more information, click here to visit the “Get Answers” page of the myRA website.

03/09/2016

State-Managed Retirement Savings Accounts Now in 27 States

Retirement jar 1Several states are working on plans to help workers save for retirement. The Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that only about half of full-time workers employed by small businesses or organizations have access to an employer-based retirement plan. By comparison, the numbers show 85 percent of Americans who work for employers with 100 or more employees do have access to an employer-provided retirement plan or benefits program.

To help close the gap, some states are providing access for eligible workers to state-managed individual retirement accounts funded by automatic deductions from the worker’s paychecks.  For example, in 2017 Illinois will launch the Secure Choice Retirement Savings Program, which gives workers a retirement plan option. Full-time employees working for qualified businesses (who do not already provide retirement benefits) will be automatically enrolled into a direct deduction retirement savings plan with a minimum three percent deduction each paycheck.  The employee can choose to have more withheld or to opt out of the program entirely. The money is deposited into a Roth IRA.

The Pension Rights Center in Washington, DC has been monitoring the development of state-administered retirement plans for private-sector workers. It shows that currently 27 states have already approved or are debating proposals to launch state-based retirement plans including: Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

Last September, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) published a report detailing how “half of private sector workers, especially those who are low-income or employed by small firms, lack coverage from a workplace retirement savings program primarily because they do not have access.” The GAO is recommending ways that the federal government can make it easier for states to manage such plans, while not placing a financial or administrative burden on small business.

01/15/2016

Tax Extenders & The Deficit Dilemma

Though Congress has received some applause for reviving a set of more than 50 tax breaks, called “tax extenders,” there is as much dismay-driven head shaking over the fact that the bipartisan agreement and the now signed budget bill dig the federal deficit hole even deeper.

The new tax law, entitled the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015, and the newly signed funding bill provide $1.1 trillion to cover spending for most government agencies to the end of fiscal year 2016, perhaps coincidentally past the upcoming presidential election. The defense sector, NASA, the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health received a bit of a boost with most other agency funding remaining flat. ENews 2016 pic tax-credit3

IRS funding restrictions remain, so it’s expected that taxpayers will continue experiencing communication and customer service problems and an increase in computer-generated correspondence audits throughout 2016 and 2017. The new National Taxpayer Advocate Annual Report to Congress blasts the IRS for planning to “substantially reduce telephone and face-to-face interaction with taxpayers,” turning that job over to tax return preparers and tax software companies.

Meanwhile, the good news for taxpayers is that the PATH Act makes permanent several charitable tax provisions, indicating that lawmakers support using tax incentives to encourage charitable giving. For example, those 70 ½ or older may contribute up to $100,000 from an IRA directly to a charity with the contribution qualifying for their required minimum distribution (also known as Qualified Charitable Distribution (QCD) rules).

Other permanently renewed tax provisions include the American Opportunity Tax Credit for college expenses and the deduction for state and local sales taxes. The schoolteacher expense deduction has been enhanced and made permanent, as has the child tax credit.

The mortgage insurance premiums and qualified residence interest deductions have been extended for another year. Taxpayers who suffered losses from selling their home for less than the outstanding mortgage will also be able to avoid the tax consequences from debt cancellation under the Mortgage Debt Relief Act for another year.

Companies that utilize bonus depreciation like those involved in the telecommunications industry or who invest in capital-intensive projects will continue enjoying this helpful tax provision for a few more years. The tax law also makes permanent the research and development tax credit, which encourages important business R&D like that in the pharmaceutical and defense sectors.

The solar investment tax credit (ITC) and the wind production tax credit (PTC) are being phased out but will remain active through 2019 and 2021 respectively. The energy industry overall has received both tax incentives and funding resources, adding a boost of confidence to alternative energy producers.

Tax increases levied on individuals and businesses to pay for the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) continue to be unpopular, and some were not enacted. Now it’s possible the two most controversial taxes may be repealed. These are the proposed tax on medical devices and the 40% excise “Cadillac” taxes on higher-priced employer-sponsored health plans that compete with government-sponsored plans.

The 2015 year-end budget battle, which starts our new tax year without delays, was a fistfight compared to the combative, destructive delay-causing 2014 debate. Yet, even as lawmakers are cooling to budget debates, the looming budget deficit has not disappeared and continues to grow. Our 2016 budget will add to the deficit, rather than reduce it. The Congressional Budget Office reports that overall US Treasury debt has grown to 74% of GDP that “could have serious negative consequences for the nation, including restraining economic growth in the long term ... and eventually increasing the risk of financial crisis.”

Overall, the bipartisan tax bill was passed with the understanding that Congress is committed to comprehensive tax reform that will simplify the tax code, eliminate temporary provisions and lower tax rates by broadening the tax base. Lawmakers who supported the PATH Act stated in a news release, “Americans deserve a simpler, fairer and flatter tax code that’s built for growth, and this bill will help make that possible.” The 2016 election year will likely determine how far that ship will sail.

If you have any questions about how the current tax law affects your individual and/or business tax obligation, please contact us now at McRuer CPAs for a tax planning session.

04/13/2015

Financial Transaction Tax and How It May Affect You

Washington lawmakers are watching the Financial Transaction Tax (FTT) debate in Europe as Democrat party leaders have made enacting this kind of tax a central part of their economic proposals for 2015.  The effects of this debate could reach across international money markets into the pockets of common American taxpayers.

NYSEA FTT is a  monetary transactions tax usually associated with the financial sector as compared to consumption taxes that consumers pay on products and services.  Democrat Congressman Keith Ellison of Minnesota has introduced an even more specific “Inclusive Prosperity Act” which would tax the sale of stocks, bonds and derivatives.  It is part of the on-going party theme of supporting “Main Street over Wall Street.”  He claims the tax would reduce market speculation, discourage high-volume and high-speed trading, and slow down the proliferation of complex derivatives.

Republican FTT opponents argue these kinds of taxes would do little to harm Wall Street, even admitting they would raise badly needed revenue, but disagree about where the money would come from.  They claim FTTs would put financial stress on working Americans by increasing the costs of having individual, family and employee retirement accounts.  This would occur at a time when retirement plans operated by corporations are disappearing and Americans are already struggling with costs, both in time and money, associated with managing their own IRAs.  They say the new taxes would make it more difficult for common people to save and invest.

Financial transaction taxes in general are usually proposed at very small percentage rates, but they could affect all transactions, of which there may be dozens (or even hundreds depending upon the size and scope) per account every day.  Proponents believe the taxes would raise billions of dollars in new revenues.  While experts predict the debate will not lead to a specific action this year, the issue will remain on the burner ready to heat up in time for the 2016 Presidential race.

Worldwide, there are several types of financial transaction taxes being implemented by various organizations and regions.  Some are domestic meaning they are imposed only within one nation or financial region.  Others are multinational, and affect transactions made between countries.  Nearly 50 nations have some form of FTT today.

EU finance ministers have been fiercely debating the scope of the tax pushing for a wide tax base with low tax rates.  They have made a public commitment to start a EU FTT on January 1, 2016 with what’s called an “extra-territorial” reach across markets and nations.  Yet, the last meeting of the 28 Member States in February ended with little progress on key issues and they are not set to negotiate again until May.  Still to be worked out; who will collect the tax, the penalty for non-payment and who will be responsible for paying the penalty.

03/19/2015

April 1st Deadline - No Fooling!

IRA payThe IRS has issued a reminder to taxpayers who may have turned 70 1/2 years old in 2014.  April 1st is the deadline to begin receiving their retirement plan distributions from IRAs and work place related retirement plans.

Here is the actual release from the IRS with more information and with links to more information including videos and tax forms.  Please contact us online or call us at 816.741.7882 if you have any questions.

-------------IRS RELEASE March 19, 2015 -------------------

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today reminded taxpayers who turned 70½ during 2014 that in most cases they must start receiving required minimum distributions (RMDs) from Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) and workplace retirement plans by Wednesday, April 1, 2015.

The April 1 deadline applies to owners of traditional IRAs but not Roth IRAs. Normally, it also applies to participants in various workplace retirement plans, including 401(k), 403(b) and 457 plans.

The April 1 deadline only applies to the required distribution for the first year. For all subsequent years, the RMD must be made by Dec. 31. So, a taxpayer who turned 70½ in 2014 and receives the first required payment on April 1, 2015, for example, must still receive the second RMD by Dec. 31, 2015. 

Affected taxpayers who turned 70½ during 2014 must figure the RMD for the first year using the life expectancy as of their birthday in 2014 and their account balance on Dec. 31, 2013. The trustee reports the year-end account value to the IRA owner on Form 5498  in Box 5. Worksheets and life expectancy tables for making this computation can be found in the Appendices to Publication 590-B.

Most taxpayers use Table III  (Uniform Lifetime) to figure their RMD. For a taxpayer who reached age 70½ in 2014 and turned 71 before the end of the year, for example, the first required distribution would be based on a distribution period of 26.5 years. A separate table, Table II, applies to a taxpayer married to a spouse who is more than 10 years younger and is the taxpayer’s only beneficiary.

Though the April 1 deadline is mandatory for all owners of traditional IRAs and most participants in workplace retirement plans, some people with workplace plans can wait longer to receive their RMD. Usually, employees who are still working can, if their plan allows, wait until April 1 of the year after they retire to start receiving these distributions. See Tax on Excess Accumulation inPublication 575. Employees of public schools and certain tax-exempt organizations with 403(b) plan accruals before 1987 should check with their employer, plan administrator or provider to see how to treat these accruals.

The IRS encourages taxpayers to begin planning now for any distributions required during 2015. An IRA trustee must either report the amount of the RMD to the IRA owner or offer to calculate it for the owner. Often, the trustee shows the RMD amount in Box 12b on Form 5498. For a 2015 RMD, this amount would be on the 2014 Form 5498 that is normally issued in January 2015.

More information on RMDs, including answers to frequently asked questions, can be found on IRS.gov.

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