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Wealth Accumulation

03/07/2016

Money Fights and Millennials

A new survey of Millennial couples says choices about finances are among the top reasons they argue. There are 80 million Millennials in the U.S. alone, and they are expected to be spending up to $200 billion annually by 2017. This is the reason business, political and social experts are keeping a close eye on their habits and lifestyle choices.

Millennials are the generation generally born in the mid 1980s and up to the early 2000s.  In a joint effort, the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) and the Ad Council surveyed couples who were between 25 to 34 years of age, employed, and married or living with a partner.  The results revealed 88% say financial decisions cause tension. Of that number, 31% say they argue about money weekly, and 20% say they argue about finances daily.

Couple fight over moneyExperts define Millennials as racially diverse, sociable (especially active on social networks), community-minded, health conscious and more liberal politically. They are apt to spend money on higher-priced goods if the products or services are connected to a “good cause” or a “healthy standard.” The problem, the survey shows, is that while Millennials seem to enjoy discussing and supporting important issues with their dollars, they fail to share their feelings and habits about money with the person they are closest to and who would be the most affected. When asked, less than 50% said they had discussed finances in detail with their loved one before marriage.

Many Millennials today enter into long-term relationships already burdened with high monthly expenses connected to credit card bills and higher education loans. Even though the survey results showed nearly half of the couples paid an equal share of household expenses, the couples said their partner had different financial habits and debt issues that made saving difficult.

The National CPA Financial Literacy Commission warns Millennials that greater spending power comes with a greater responsibility to understand a potential partner’s financial values and beliefs. A news release emphasizes, “We encourage couples to have a serious conversation about their financial hopes and dreams and the steps they need to take to get there.”

The AICPA features a “Feed the Pig” website that provides tips for Millennial couples to help them think beyond the honeymoon phase to daily money matters. If you are thinking about getting married or want to confirm financial choices to build a better financial future as a couple, contact us at McRuer CPAs.

05/07/2015

Your Foreign Accounts Tax Deadline Alert

The global marketplace has round-the-clock worldwide Internet-enabled communications, sales and trading cycles. That has ensured more Americans than ever before work, live and/or do business in or with another country. Think about your accounts; you could be among the 4 out of 10 of Americans who have a bank account, brokerage account, mutual fund, trust or other type of foreign financial account or foreign asset. If so, a June 30th filing deadline approaches to meet updated tax reporting guidelines, even if your account has produced no taxable income.

Globe and calculator in blueThere are several different kinds of tax and crime-prevention documents that need to be filed depending upon whether you are an American working overseas; paying an American to work for your company overseas; a business owner selling and/or producing products and services overseas; an entity organized in a foreign jurisdiction; and/or someone who has international investments.

The Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) requires the filing of a Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR) annually for anyone with a foreign financial interest in types of foreign accounts by June 30th. This particularly affects Americans who work overseas and their employers, as well as those with interests in foreign accounts (including those with ownership interests in or signature authority over bank and certain investment accounts).

The FATCA was passed to ensure that income is reported and any applicable taxes are paid, though some American-based global companies claim the variety of tax and crime-fighting policies enacted by several government agencies are hard to keep up with and are creating an undue burden.

Ready for more acronyms? The FBAR filing is part of the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) that requires you to report foreign financial accounts exceeding certain thresholds to the Department of Treasury. This report, FBAR Form FinCEN Report 114, must now be filed electronically through the BSA’s E-Filing System. Those individuals with only signature authority over these accounts have until next June in 2016 to begin the electronic filing of these annual reports.

U.S. taxpayers with specified foreign financial assets that exceed certain thresholds must also report those assets to the IRS on Form 8938 Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets. Again, this requirement is in addition to the FBAR filing requirement.

But wait, there's more... If you happen to be a U.S. citizen or resident who is an officer or director of a foreign corporation, you may also have additional filing requirements including a Form 5471  Information Return of U.S. Persons With Respect to Certain Foreign Corporations.  Filing a Form 5471 is required if an American has acquired (in one or more transactions) either stock which meets the 10% stock ownership requirement with respect to the foreign corporation or an additional 10% or more (in value or voting power) of the outstanding stock of the foreign corporation. A person is considered to have “acquired” stock in a foreign corporation when that person has an unqualified right to receive the stock, even though the stock is not actually issued.  To find out more click here for the IRS Form 5471 information. 

FBAR-Reminder-840x440What if you don’t file? Delinquent, insufficient or improper FBAR filings have hefty penalties. The penalties for failure to file an FBAR include a civil penalty of $10,000 for each non-willful violation. But if your violation is found to be willful, the penalty is the greater of $100,000 or 50 percent of the amount in the account for each violation – and each year you didn’t or don't file is counted as a separate violation.

While many commentators agree that income and asset holdings should be accountable, the method and overlapping reporting issues are so complicated that some experts argue it may be decreasing the will of Americans to look worldwide for employment and customers, hindering American competitiveness on the worldwide scale.

Some experts call the tax policies “inexplicably complex and overly intrusive”. One American lawyer working overseas writes that the “regulatory net applies so broadly that personal and business accounts of law-abiding Americans simply trying to comply with the rules are caught up in its paperwork net – and drowning.”

If you have questions about whether you must file a FBAR and/or other tax forms, contact us now at McRuer CPAs.  Reminder: If you need to file a report you should do so by the June 30th deadline to avoid a costly omission.*

*This information summarizes certain recent tax, legislative and/or regulatory developments that may interest McRuer CPAs clients and friends. This report is intended for general information purposes only, is not a complete summary of the matters referred to, and does not represent legal, regulatory or tax advice nor does it constitute a professional service offering to the recipient.  Recipients of this report are cautioned to seek appropriate professional advice regarding any of the matters discussed in this report considering the recipients' own particular situation. McRuer CPAs does not undertake to keep the recipients of this report advised of future developments or of changes in any of the matters discussed in this report.

 

 

04/13/2015

Financial Transaction Tax and How It May Affect You

Washington lawmakers are watching the Financial Transaction Tax (FTT) debate in Europe as Democrat party leaders have made enacting this kind of tax a central part of their economic proposals for 2015.  The effects of this debate could reach across international money markets into the pockets of common American taxpayers.

NYSEA FTT is a  monetary transactions tax usually associated with the financial sector as compared to consumption taxes that consumers pay on products and services.  Democrat Congressman Keith Ellison of Minnesota has introduced an even more specific “Inclusive Prosperity Act” which would tax the sale of stocks, bonds and derivatives.  It is part of the on-going party theme of supporting “Main Street over Wall Street.”  He claims the tax would reduce market speculation, discourage high-volume and high-speed trading, and slow down the proliferation of complex derivatives.

Republican FTT opponents argue these kinds of taxes would do little to harm Wall Street, even admitting they would raise badly needed revenue, but disagree about where the money would come from.  They claim FTTs would put financial stress on working Americans by increasing the costs of having individual, family and employee retirement accounts.  This would occur at a time when retirement plans operated by corporations are disappearing and Americans are already struggling with costs, both in time and money, associated with managing their own IRAs.  They say the new taxes would make it more difficult for common people to save and invest.

Financial transaction taxes in general are usually proposed at very small percentage rates, but they could affect all transactions, of which there may be dozens (or even hundreds depending upon the size and scope) per account every day.  Proponents believe the taxes would raise billions of dollars in new revenues.  While experts predict the debate will not lead to a specific action this year, the issue will remain on the burner ready to heat up in time for the 2016 Presidential race.

Worldwide, there are several types of financial transaction taxes being implemented by various organizations and regions.  Some are domestic meaning they are imposed only within one nation or financial region.  Others are multinational, and affect transactions made between countries.  Nearly 50 nations have some form of FTT today.

EU finance ministers have been fiercely debating the scope of the tax pushing for a wide tax base with low tax rates.  They have made a public commitment to start a EU FTT on January 1, 2016 with what’s called an “extra-territorial” reach across markets and nations.  Yet, the last meeting of the 28 Member States in February ended with little progress on key issues and they are not set to negotiate again until May.  Still to be worked out; who will collect the tax, the penalty for non-payment and who will be responsible for paying the penalty.

04/07/2015

Social Security Disability In Trouble

Officials report the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program is in trouble financially and in less than two years is expected to not be able to pay full benefits.

Social-security-disabilitySSDI provides supplemental income to the mentally or physically disabled who cannot work full-time.  The Social Security Administration reports that more than 11 million Americans receive SSDI payments each year.

The SSDI has petitioned lawmakers to access funds in the broader, less financially stressed Social Security retirement program until its own funding deficit can be solved.

It’s not surprising that positions about this issue divide along party lines. Republicans want the SSDI to fix its underlying costly administration structure that drains funds, which could otherwise be paid as benefits.  They also want to change eligibility requirements to limit benefit payments to those who are most needy. 

Democrats claim the Republicans had already targeted SSDI for budget cuts and are using the current fiscal crisis as a way to cut benefits overall creating "a crisis where none exists.”  They say Republicans are refusing for political reasons to accept a proposal supported by President Obama that they claim could fix the problem.  A number of Democrats are pushing for increases in both disability and social security retirement benefits.

Financial and political analysts agree the issue will be a major debate topic and will be one of the first action items the next President must address in early 2016.

The health of the larger Social Security retirement fund remains unclear.  Annual reports predict the fund will be depleted by 2033.  The Heritage Foundation confirms the cash-flow deficit began in 2010 when $51 billion in benefits were paid above what was received in payroll taxes, and numbers show the deficit is getting worse each year.  An effort to reallocate funds from one resource to another is considered a temporary fix.  At the present payment rate all reserve funds may dry up in 20 years.

Some proposed solutions include increasing the Social Security tax from 6.2% to 7% of earnings, changing the cost-of-living adjustment, enacting a means test that would reduce or eliminate social security for retirees with higher incomes, and raising the retirement age to 68.

If you have questions about how your retirement plans may be affected by Social Security funding issues, contact McRuer CPAs for a review of your strategies and goals.

03/27/2015

Income Taxes When You Sell Your Home

With so much debate over taxes on assets and capital gains, many taxpayers are confused about the tax rules on gains or losses when selling their personal home.

House soldIf you sold a home in the 2014 tax year, you may be able to exclude part or all of the profit from your income.  This tax rule generally applies if you’ve owned and used the property as your main home for at least two out of five years before the date of sale.

A capital gain or loss is measured against the “basis” of the property; that is, the price that you paid for it when you purchased it originally plus the amounts you paid for any improvements.  Note that you cannot add the value of your own labor.  You can use an IRS worksheet called Publication 523 to calculate the gain (or loss) on the sale.

You are allowed to exclude from your income up to $250,000 of capital gains from the sale of a personal residence ($500,000 on a joint return).  Additionally, to be clear, any gain on the sale of a personal residence is not subject to the new Net Investment Income Tax that was enacted in 2013.

If you can exclude all of the gain, you don’t need to report the sale of the home on your income tax return.  But, know that you can exclude a gain from the sale of only one main home per two-year period.  If you own more than one home, the “main” home is the one where you reside most of the time.  You must pay tax on the gain from selling any other home.

If you can’t exclude all of the gain on your home’s sale, you’ll need to report the home sale on your individual income tax return.  In that case, you will probably also receive a Form 1099-S indicating you have earned proceeds from a real estate transaction. You must submit that form with your income tax return.

If you sell your main home for which you received a first-time homebuyer credit, special rules may apply on any gains that may redirect the funds to repay the credit you previously received.

What if you sell your home at a loss?  If the money that you receive from selling your home is less than your cost basis, there is no tax benefit.  Even though it may be a loss, you cannot deduct the loss from your income.

If you sold a home, or are planning to sell your main home, and want to better understand the tax consequences, contact us at McRuer CPAs for an analysis.

03/18/2015

Divorce, Death, Benefits and Taxes

The emotional stress and damage of divorce can have even more lasting consequences if personal finances and assets are not updated to reflect your changed situation.

It’s particularly important to address what will happen after your death, when certain assets and benefits may unintentionally be passed to your former spouse or his or her family.

Divorce-money-fightFor example, a current New York court case involving the assets of a woman who died at age 43 has now reached that state’s appellate court.  The woman’s family is battling her former in-laws who stand to inherit her home that her family has owned for generations, all because she did not update her will.  New York divorce laws automatically prevent her ex-husband from inheriting the property, but her secondary beneficiaries remain her ex-in-laws; so they are fighting over the property now.

It may be emotionally difficult to address your financial assets in the midst of divorce, but if you are going through a divorce or have even been divorced several years, it will pay off in the long run for you and your family to review and update your financial documents.

Be sure you have updated your estate plans, check insurance and other beneficiary designations and beneficiary deeds.  Also provide your loved ones with copies of the updated documents, or let them know where to find them.  Divorcing couples should also consider individually seeking a new financial adviser to avoid any conflicts of interest. 

Make certain your will clearly states your intentions, and that your powers of attorney, health-care proxy, and beneficiary designations on IRAs, insurance policies, bank accounts, brokerage accounts, and annuities name the people that you wish.  Remember, no matter what a will says, these financial accounts and policies will pass to the individuals named on them, so having updated directives for each account is extremely important.

As we have detailed in our blog IRAs Need Updated Beneficiary Forms, changes in beneficiaries for annuities and IRAs must be submitted in writing and require a signed and dated document be sent to the financial institution handling the account or policy.

For some accounts, the original financial agreements stipulate the ex-spouse cannot be removed as a beneficiary, so the beneficiary may want to take steps to clarify the arrangements to ensure his or her name remains on the account.

When a divorce is final, the final divorce decree may be sent to the plan administrator directing how money in IRA accounts should be divided and transferred into separate accounts.  Company-sponsored qualified retirement plans will need additional steps.  In those cases, the court must issue a Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO) properly apportioning retirement plan assets between the former spouses.

However you wish to change your beneficiary status or account information, it’s also a good idea to request a written confirmation notice from your insurance company, financial planner and/or banker confirming they have received and acted on your changes.  Then, keep all the updated documents in a secure location that can be found in the event that you may become incapacitated or die.

Divorce may also affect a person’s current and future income tax obligation, and may affect future taxes owed on assets and retirement accounts.  Receiving or paying alimony payments or child support may also have tax consequences.

Divorce is painful.  Planning your next steps both personally and financially can help ease concerns as time passes.

Consider meeting with a McRuer CPAs expert who will help you identify and act upon the best financial strategy to help you now and in the years ahead.  Contact us online or call 816.741.7882 for a consultation.

03/31/2014

Actual Taxes for Virtual Money

Virtual currency is the latest product of the global internet-connected marketplace we live and work in today.  The most popular form of virtual currency is called Bitcoin. Now the IRS has issued new guidance ensuring the same old tax rules apply to this new kind of money.

Bitcoins are under scrutiny for a variety of reasons.  First, let’s look at what virtual money is and how it works.  Bitcoin is a payment network where a user can anonymously use their country’s currency to quickly purchase any amount of bitcoins on an exchange.  The digital bitcoins may then be used to buy any kind of product or service that accepts virtual money payments.

Bitcoin_bigToday, everything from webhosting services, to pizza and even manicures can be purchased with bitcoins. Bitcoins make international payments easy and cheap because this kind of currency has not yet been subject to any country’s regulations nor is it controlled by a Central Bank.

Think about how you and your family may attend a local fair.  In order to ‘purchase’ a seat on the latest spinning carnival ride, you must use your cash to purchase a ticket at a booth.  Then you give the ticket to the ride’s operator in order to take your seat.  Some rides cost more tickets than others and price adjustments can be made seamlessly and quickly.  Virtual money operates in the same way. 

When you exchange your currency for bitcoin, you have proof of the bitcoin value in what is called a “digital wallet” which you can choose to set up on your own computer, mobile device or in the cloud. You may now use the virtual account to send or accept bitcoins for selling or buying products and services.  The wallet ID is all a buyer or seller sees, so the purchase is virtually anonymous.

More merchants nationwide are beginning to accept these kinds of virtual currency payments, because they avoid paying the 2% to 3% credit card transaction fees or other transaction costs charged by their ‘middle man’ bank.  The bitcoins received can be exchanged right away for deposit as the business’ currency of choice.  This kind of payment is rapidly growing in popularity for companies who provide technical and online services to a worldwide client base.

Bitcoins are becoming so popular that even money market investors are buying and selling the bitcoins as a commodity.  In fact, speculators are now fueling price volatility because they are buying and selling bitcoins at a far greater rate than the rate of general commercial use.

That leads us to the downside.  Because of the anonymous nature of purchases, bitcoins have become the currency of choice for the online purchase of illegal drugs, illicit activities and paying for legitimate services with the provider expecting to be able to avoid taxes.  There is also a warning about investing in currencies like this that have no Central Bank authority to guarantee or insure values.  

Now, as bitcoins are making a noticable impact in the marketplace, the IRS is issuing new warnings to end any questions about the taxability of bitcoins and virtual money payments.  In a new IRS guidance, the agency makes it clear that, for U.S. federal tax purposes that the same general tax principles that apply to property transactions also apply to transactions using virtual currency.

The Journal of Accountancy explains that “in computing gross income, a taxpayer who receives virtual currency as payment for goods or services must include the fair market value (FMV) of the virtual currency (measured in U.S. dollars) as of the date the virtual currency was received.”

There are also several tax rules affecting virtual currency transactions and income.  For example, some people participate in what’s called “mining” to earn bitcoins.  It is a type of reward system for solving complex math problems.  This kind of bitcoin income is reportable.

Some global service providers and contractors are accepting bitcoins for payments to employees or themselves.  Wages paid to employees are taxable to the employee and independent contractors also face the same self-employment tax rules with payers required to issue Form 1099.

Experts say some form of virtual money is here to stay as our internet-connected world provides global accessibility 24 hours a day.  Your decision about how and when you choose to use virtual money should be carefully considered, especially if you are considering whether to accept bitcoins as payment for goods or services.  For more information on how this issue may affect you or your business, please contact us at McRuer CPAs for a review of your goals and the possible tax consequences.

02/18/2014

IRAs Need Updated Designated Beneficiary Forms

Individual Retirement Accounts have been around long enough now that many Americans are learning what happens when they inherit an IRA. It’s not always good news.  If the owner has not filed an up-to-date beneficiary form, the heir of the estate risks losing a major portion of the IRA value to taxes and fees. IRA-nest-egg

The Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) reports the average IRA value is close to $94,000. The EBRI also says there are nearly 15 million IRA accounts held by more than 11 million people.  With total assets of more than $1 trillion, it’s important to make certain that, should the owner die, the IRA doesn’t lose its value upon transfer to a new owner.

Advisors warn that many IRA owners mistakenly believe because they have a will, the person(s) they list as their heir(s) will automatically receive the IRA to use as a savings tool or turn into cash in whatever manner they wish.  Yet, without a specific and up-to-date IRA beneficiary designation form for each IRA, the beneficiary may be forced to empty the account right away risking taxes and penalties; and may even be bumped into a higher income tax bracket.   Some states require the accounts to go through probate court when there is no beneficiary form.

IRA owners should fill out what is a very simple beneficiary form separate from their will.  That way, when the owner dies, the designated beneficiary is able to determine the best distribution strategy over his or her lifetime.  A new beneficiary form is needed any time an IRA account is changed or updated, or the account is moved to a new custodian.

Typically, IRA beneficiaries must take distributions during their lifetime.  Inherited traditional IRAs require taxes to be paid on distributions.  Rollover, SEP, and SIMPLE IRAs are treated the same way. Beneficiaries are not required to pay taxes on distributions from an inherited Roth IRA.

Generally, surviving spouses have several choices including even disclaiming up to 100% of the IRA assets, which, besides avoiding extra taxable income, enables their children to inherit the IRA assets.  But, if the spouse decides to take a lump sum distribution, or begins distributions on a traditional IRA, taxes must be paid.

Non-spouse beneficiaries have fewer choices.  Among them, including taking the lump sum amount and paying a large share in federal taxes; disclaiming all or part of the assets for up to 9 months after the previous owner’s death; or begin taking taxable distributions from the account.

If you inherit an IRA, you cannot roll it over into your own IRA. You must also make certain it is re-titled as an inherited IRA.  If you move the IRA to a new custodian, make certain it is made as a “trustee-to-trustee” transfer or it will be considered as a taxable total distribution, thereby, ending the account as an IRA.  There are deadlines for your actions and you can even face the dreaded 50% penalty if you don’t make a required withdrawal in time.

To ensure you leave as much of your IRA asset as possible to whom you choose, or if you inherit an IRA, consult your financial advisor for the best steps to take to lessen the taxes and maximize the advantages of these retirement accounts.

If you have any questions about your financial savings plans, beneficiaries and the tax consequences of your choices, please contact us at McRuer CPAs.

06/13/2013

Taxes and the Second Home Dream

Federal tax provisions affecting residential real estate are being reviewed for possible cuts. The National Association of Realtors has recently defended the tax deductions associated with home ownership in testimony before the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee.

Tax deductions make home ownership financially attractive.  New tax laws provide updated guidelines on mortgage availability and regulations on lenders.  These and other benefits have helped increase the purchase rate of “second” homes.   But as tax laws continue to change, homebuyers may need to more carefully consider the tax consequences of their purchase.

Nationally, about one third of home purchases today are for second homes.  Second homes are most often purchased as an investment, a vacation home, or a rental property. 

Real estate professionals say more homeowners today are purchasing a home for their elderly parents or their adult children who cannot otherwise afford to pay for a home during the economic downturn.  These relatives may have few or no resources of their own to make down payments or pay for home repairs. Some may pay rent and/or utilities for the residence.

Should you consider purchasing a second home, there are tax advantages and a few warnings.

Keys to second home

First, a warning: there’s a potential pitfall for higher income taxpayers who are subject to the alternative minimum tax (AMT).  Those who must pay AMT cannot deduct real estate taxes, they must pay tax on any gain on the sale of the property, and should there be a loss on the sale of the property later, the loss is not deductible.

There are several tax deduction benefits though, that make the purchase of a second home attractive, such as:

Mortgage interest: Mortgage interest paid on a loan used to finance the price of the purchase, improvements made to the home, or the building of a second home is typically 100 percent deductible, just as it is on a primary residence.

Rental income:  If you rent the property no more than 14 days a year, you can pocket the rental income tax free.  If you rent the property for more than 14 days you must report all rental income, but you can deduct a portion of the mortgage interest, property taxes, insurance premiums, utilities and other rental expenses.

Investment:  If you buy a property and expect that you may sell it again when property values go up, you are allowed to earn a certain amount of profit tax free.  But the practice is not as lucrative as it used to be.  Congress has changed the tax law to give the greater benefit to those who have lived in the second house for a time as a permanent residence before they sell it.  Tax rules on losses have also changed; though losses collectively over time may be deducted from taxable profit when you sell the property.

As you review the financial considerations, remember that much of the tax benefit depends upon how high your overall income is and how much you may use the property yourself.

Each taxpayer’s story is unique, so the purchase of a second home should be deliberated carefully and with the assistance of not only a real estate professional, but also a tax professional you trust.  For more information, contact us at McRuer CPAs.


03/19/2013

4% Retirement Spending Rule - is it Outdated?

Is the “4% Rule” meaningless for retirement planning today?  Many financial planning experts say a combination of extreme marketplace fluctuations, unpredictable inflation, decreasing income growth and increasing taxes prove the spending rule for retirement is antiquated.

Retired couple 1In a recent survey by The Conference Board, thousands of 45 to 60 year old Americans were asked
about their retirement plans.  Nearly two-thirds of the respondents expect they will have to work well into their retirement years in order to afford to pay basic expenses. The majority said this is because their ability to save is too low and the general living expenses that their savings will have to cover are too high.  They also expect to live longer and endure higher health costs.

Many of tomorrow’s pending retirees say they wouldn’t be able to afford to be sick, make a repair or upgrade to their home, nor be able to make a purchase like an updated vehicle, without making a major dent in their retirement savings.

In the past, the conventional wisdom said you can take 4% from your savings the first year of retirement, and then that amount plus more to account for inflation each year.  This practice was supposed to keep you from running out of money for at least 30 years.

In a recent online Wall Street Journal article, Say Goodbye to the 4% Rule, financial reporter Kelly Greene wrote the 4% rule was conceived by a financial planner in the 1990s who, quoting from the article, “analyzed historical returns of stocks and bonds and found that portfolios with 60% of their holdings in large-company stocks and 40% in intermediate-term U.S. bonds could sustain withdrawal rates starting at 4.15%, and adjusted each year for inflation, for every 30-year span going back to 1926-55.”

But the article shows had you retired with the above portfolio and then endured the actual market drops of the past decade, your accounts would have declined by a third and you would have less than a 30% chance of having enough money.

So, what is the answer?  Most experts agree that today, more than ever before, a customized approach is best.  You must determine realistic retirement goals and develop a spending plan that matches your lifestyle expectations with your ability to earn and save.

Because there are so many unknowns and changes, planning for how taxes will affect your savings and your retirement income has become an annual ‘must do’.  No matter how close you are to retirement, consider these common-sense tips offered through Investopedia as you schedule your retirement investment planning session with McRuer CPAs:

  • Avoid too much risk.
  • Avoid too little risk.
  • Don’t retire too soon.
  • Try not to retire all at once.
  • Buy long-term care insurance.
  • Do live within your means.
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